Replied to a tweet by an author (Twitter)
#tdc3188 #ds106 Make a Phenakistoscope http://youtube.com/watch?v=2rzwdRqsuVM

#tdc3188 #ds106 I now have heard how to pronounce Phenakistoscope (I still can’t say it). This reminds me of a rabbithole @cogdog sent me down and lead to

CSS phenakistiscope

&

More phenakistoscope.

I might have to play again now…

Replied to a tweet ( )
4/15 #HeyPresstoConf20 For fun try adding /wp-json/wp/v2/posts/ to any WordPress url or /wp-json/wp/v2/posts/?per_page=1 will get you the latest post or /wp-json/wp/v2/comments for 20 recent comments or /wp-json/wp/v2/search?search=splot will return search results for "splot"

Alan, you might like Multi WP Blog search from a while back. Local storage could make it actually useful.

Replied to Glitch, Remix, a #NetNarr Exquisite Corpse (CogDogBlog)
There you go, try guess the nature of this blog post from a word heavy vague title.

I think I’d guess that a post with Glitch, Remix, and Exquisite Corpse in the title is one that is I’d be interested in;-)
Glitch is a pretty interesting place. Interestingly I made something there a while back of which Kevin was the only user!
Excited to see what range of things you get up to with glitch.

Replied to A Generator for Martin (CogDogBlog)
I saw Martin Weller’s tweet out for a randomizing text generator: He got lots of replies (which is what make twitter useful when often it can not be), though many were just offering tools, no…

Hi Alan,
Love the random. Had a wee go at forking and having a googlesheet as a source. It might be a way of folk making their own without having to edit html…

http://git.johnj.info/edtechaphors/?id=1Tk-IUE8OG_InI6KjZ4GAFMm4IyJl1PoZQYzHCbm4fN8

Liked A Generator for Martin (CogDogBlog)
I saw Martin Weller’s tweet out for a randomizing text generator: He got lots of replies (which is what make twitter useful when often it can not be), though many were just offering tools, no…

I always like the random…

I’ve a vague idea you could run this from a google sheet allowing folk to generate more of this sort of thing.

Replied to Easy IndieWeb Login with WP-Dimension Theme (CogDogBlog)
Those big time motivational speakers who talk about starting to learn with a problem you want to solve have never really accounted for serendipitous learning. Is everything as simple as problem -&g…

Hi Alan,
This is interesting stuff, you had me at serendipitous😉

I think the IndieWeb is worth raving about, I’ve not really figured out all the technical details, I tend to install, see if it works and forget.

Even more exciting is with the IndieAuth plugin you can log in with your own blog as opposed to relying on twitter or github.

I love to chat about some ideas around aggregated courses and the IndieWeb that are floating around my head inspired by micro.blog.

Alan ask:

Interviewing Your Domain

And suppies some questions, just like blogs way back when!

What is your domain name and what is the story, meaning behind your choice of that as a name?

johnjohnston.info ’cause .com and .co.uk and others were not available. I waited too long to get my name.

What was your understanding, experience with domains before you got one? Where were you publishing online before having one of your own?

This takes me down memory lane.

I started publishing on the web on aol. At http://members.aol.com/weefishes, (Internet archive from 1998), I was trying to share and sell some HyperCard stacks and applications. My business was called LittleFish. This lead to my first domain http://littlefishsw.co.uk I guess I wanted to have a more professional URL and more control over the content.

I took the same route with my school website, http://members.aol.com/sandaig (Archive 2001), then http://sandaigprimary.co.uk, (archive for 2003)

I started this blog on the Sandaig domain in 2005 (2007 snapshot on the Archive).

At that point I though of domains are more memorable URLs that would allow me a wee bit more freedom than AOL hosting.

I had or was involved in other domains, some of which still are in use. One of my favourite was opensourcecpd.org.uk which was a plan to follow open source principals for CPD. It never took off but I love the idea.

What was a compelling feature, reason, motivation for you to get and use a domain? When you started what did you think you would put there?

When I left Sandaig I wanted to move my blog away from the school site, so I sorted out a site and this domain. I migrated all the content for the old blog and eventually changed platforms to WordPress. I consider the blog, as continuous despite the domain and platform changes.

The blog sits at /blog I wanted the site to be more than a blog, it is full of different simple and messy web experiments and tests.

What kinds of sites have you set up one your domain since then? How are you using them? Please share URLs

I’ve no subdomain on this domain, but lots of folders. My favourites include my ds106 blog at /106, Flickr CC Stamper at /fcc and my /walks.

I do have another domain johnj.info which has a few sub domains that point to a far number of sites:

What helped you or would have helped you more when you started using your domain? What do you still struggle with?

My domains grew in a messy and organic way. Previous choices affect future ones. Of course I’d like everything neat and tidy but…

I don’t handle or control the dns for this site. Hence the johnj.info domain and sub domains. My host does this. I stick with him because he is great and has indulged me a lot. Some other sites I host elsewhere for price and cause I like Jim too.

What kind of future plans to you have for your domain?

I am exploring the indieweb more, hopefully I’ll keep that going.

What would you say to other educators about the value, reason why to have a domain of your own? What will it take them to get going with their own domain?

I like the idea of my own space more than a domain. I like futzing. It is important, to me, to have one place. Sites in silos, or aol, or tilde spaces are fine playgrounds.but services go away. The domain is just an address pointing to my messy kingdom where I can do what I want, if I can.

I find great value in having my blog go back for years. I search it often. If I’d trusted a silo my content might have vanished by now.

Ideally everyone would get a domain automatically. Obviously this would make for a lot of domains.

featured image created with AppleScript & Gifsicle ‎autocomplete-gifs

The weeks are flying by. I was hoping to backtrack on a few things this week but Week Six. Copyright, OERs and Creative Commons – 23 Things popped into my inbox and thing 11 is quite timely.

Here and there

I’ve blogged here about copyright quite a bit, but it is a constantly interesting subject.

I am in general a respecter of copyright. I use other people’s images her on the blog and always attribute and respect copyright.

Occasionally for more creative purposes I sidestep the rules to use of old movie or tv footage on my DS106 blog for more fun stuff (example: characters). I don’t think any corporate dollars have been harmed;-)

I’ve had a licence on this blog for a while, originally a BY, Share Alike-Non Commercial one. Currently a Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 4.0 International License.

A couple of days ago I read [Trying] Going to Flickr Zero, CC0 where Alan has changed all of his Flickr licenses to CC0. I can see the point.

My flickr photos are CC-BY-SA in the same way as this blog. This got me thinking. I am, unlike Alan, no photographer. It is unlikely anyone is going to make loads of cash from any of my images (or my deathless prose here). Over the years I’ve had a couple (2) of folk contact me to use a picture of mine for “commercial” purposes, and been delighted to do so. CC0 would change little except make reuse easier.

But I do like the idea of attribution and getting attributed. The attention feels nice. It also might encourage others…

The Share Alike idea seems nice too, but I guess might occasionally make things more difficult to use. I may lose that soon.

Another recent post that looks at the issue with some subtly: On Attribution vs Privilege of CC0Reflecting Allowed | Reflecting Allowed.

But not everything I create can be CC0. Not yet. And in my local context these things can really really matter. It can make the difference between who gets a job or tenure or promotion and who doesn’t.

and in the comments:

Audrey Alan and Doug are examples of intersectionality here – no stable academic job but famous and with lots of social capital.

I’ve not really got any problems in this regard, being an amateur sharer rather than a pro.

In Primary School

This is hard. Over the past few years I’ve had to explain copyright to teachers. Now I am back in class working with 8-11 year olds. Since I was last in the classroom full time pupils spend a lot more time on line, they are very familiar with finding images via google searches but digging out the license is hard. Lots of tools now make it very easy to ignore copyright.

I fall back on providing my class with some  public domain sites to search and my FlickrCC Stampr.

Resources

Some things I’ve found useful:

Featured image: Life is Sharing | Part of a Cleveland mural, the full saying… | Flickr CC-BY Alan Levine. Stamped my module for Alan’s’flickr cc attribution bookmarklet maker.