Liked Trust Me, You Want This — Real Life (Real Life)
Host-read ads and rise of parasocial marketing

Podcasts flow naturally and pleasantly into a listener’s day to day, advertisements flow naturally and pleasantly in and out of podcasts, and persuasion ceases to register as persuasion, becoming instead a benevolent suggestion from a trusted friend, an invitation to a communal experience, an opportunity to affirm that you are loyal to the community, that you “get it,” that you belong. The danger of this is that ads, host-read or not, are profit-driven, and they deserve more skepticism than a friend’s words would warrant. Advertisements are not our friends — even if they seem to spoken by them.

the intimacy of audio is one of the affordances of podcasts. This is the cloud from that silver lining.

 

Replied to Parasocial relationships through digital media by Doug BelshawDoug Belshaw (Doug Belshaw's Thought Shrapnel)
I think we've all felt a close affinity and, dare I say, relationship with people who wouldn't know who we were if we met them in real life. In fact, I've kind of experienced the other side of this due to my TEDx Talk and the TIDE podcast. People at events would come and talk to me as if they knew m

On the other end, this makes me feel a bit uncomfortable listening to some podcasts. I used to listen to quite a few popular mac/tech podcasts, but the feeling that I knew these folk was somehow quite unpleasant. 1. I don’t & 2. I live in a very different world. They are often over long with a lot of friendly, between presenters, chat. I now keep an eye and dip in occasionally when the topic looks good thank to Castro’s triage.

Tide, I very much enjoyed because I had met irl Doug and virtually Dai. My own broadcasting/podcasting efforts  were mostly aimed at folk just like me. I’d guess I knew many of our audience.

Liked Scripting News: Friday, April 30, 2021 (Scripting News)
I've said this a million times. One more time won't hurt. Podcasting was created so everyone can make media. It was designed, deliberately, without gatekeepers. To have a podcast, you have to have a public RSS feed with enclosures. That's why you hear at the end of podcasts, "You can get this where ever you get podcasts."

The suggested punishment is a bit harsh. Everything else rings true.

Reposted a tweet by Banton Primary (Twitter)

Episode 4 of the Banton Biggies Podcast is out now. Scripted & recorded by pupils in their home and edited together by the children in school all in less than a week.https://blogs.glowscotland.org.uk/nl/bbpod/2021/03/09/bbp-episode-4/

I’d avoided doing this earlier in lockdown ’cause I though it might be tricky. Turned out easier to organise than if I was in class. Even minimal supervision of the edit in school today.

This is harder than it used to be.

We have just added our class podcast to iTunes I though it might be worth noting the steps.

The RSS feed from Glow Blogs is not optimised for podcasts so I used Feedburner to create one. You need a google account to set up on Feedburner. Once you have done that you add your RSS feed from your blog to Feedburner and tick the podcast box.

An important setting is to have an image for the podcast art.
You need to upload a square image bigger than 1400 by 1400 pixels for iTunes. Remember to change the maximum size in Settings-> Media as by default Glow Blogs resizes image bigger than 1200 pixels. Then add the URL for that image to Feedburner.

You end up with a url for your podcast feed, ours is:

http://feeds.feedburner.com/BantonBiggiesPodcast

you then submit that at the apple iTunes Connect site. You need an Apple ID for that. It is pretty straightforward. You can check the feed and submit it.

Feedburner is showing its age and is missing some of the tags that Apple likes but it still works. Feedburner was taken over by google a while back and I hope it does not go the way of Google Reader. I don’t know of another free service like it?

My classes podcast is approaching episode 1 and we are having a deal of fun working on it.

Liked Scripting News: Wednesday, October 28, 2020 (Scripting News)
This is awesome. Audible wanted to create a proprietary “podcast” network (in quotes because of the contradiction), now instead will try an open one. The power of an open juggernaut.

podcasts & rss just want to be free…

Amazon is turning Audible into a true podcast app, but it’s got a long way to go – The Verge

I started a podcast in my previous school in 2005 which produced episode fairly regularly until 2008 when I moved to a development officer post in North Lanarkshire.

I found podcasting to really worthwhile, fun and motivating. It involved children in all sorts of learning and created many opportunities.

I’ve also produced a fair number of podcast over at EduTalk and play with microcasting  here.

I spent a fair bit of time in my development post trying to encourage the practise. Ironically I had more luck with video podcasting and for a while we had a Mac server running podcast producer which could server audio and video podcasts.

When I started work on Glow I was particularity keen to promote podcasting using Glow Blogs but didn’t see a lot of uptake.

Since returning to class in 2016 I’ve had podcasting in the back of my mind, we have, I think, posted the odd bit of audio to our class blog but until now now made a big deal of podcasting.

This session I decided to get it into our plans covering in particular:

By experiencing the setting up and running of a business, I can collaborate in making choices relating to the different roles and responsibilities and have evaluated its success.
SOC 2-22a

We are going to produce a multi-episode podcast and look for sponsorship to make it into a business.

There are an amazing number of opportunities in making a podcast for pupils including: writing, recording and editing, making a website, graphics production, finding sponsorship and publicity. We have already ticked of many of the skills that we audit in our learning.

I’ve also been learning a bit about GarageBand and how it has changed since the last time I used it. Exploring software with pupils is a great way for them to learn. My needs for podcasting for Edutalk were met by a wee bit of audacity and the levelator, not complex, but pupils are a bit more ambitious. I am also stepping out of my mac comfort zone and using the pupils iPads for the whole thing, or at least they are. They  are organising things in Teams (to include an isolating graphic person last week) and using the pupils iPads. GarageBand for recording, notes for writing, Teams for working together, brushes, sketches & keynote for graphics, numbers for organisation. Personally I would be using a different set of apps on a mac for these tasks. Moving to the pupils devices gives them control and puts me in an advisory role.

So far we have organised teams for different roles, made a start on a blog, graphics, scriptwriting. Our first bit of publicity has gone out and I cooped my daughter into a Skype visit to talk about her job as a tv producer (and her experience of working on a podcast).

We have started recording episode zero and I hope that will be published on the new podcast site next week. It is good to be back podcasting in class.

Replied to [rant] I hate podcasts by Nitin Khanna (nitinkhanna.com)
Ok, listen up. Podcasts are stupid. I’ve got good reasons too, if you read on. There are two types of blog posts – ramblers (like this one) and informative. That’s generally what you’ll see on the Internet. Most personal content is a rambler type of blog post. It may be the most succinct two...

There is a lot to agree with here. I’ve been guilty of creating podcast with all your worst nightmares, skype, rambling and more.

But I love podcasts. Two main reasons, one the sound of voices is different, for me, than reading a post; two, I can listen to podcasts while driving to work. I don’t want succinct  information, I want to be able to do the equivalent of rambling for listening, picking up bits and pieces, thinking of something else, paying attention to the traffic.

I remember when I started podcasting there was a txt file going round that explained, by example, how much better plain text was. That is fine if you can look at it, not so much if you are washing the dishes:-)

Enjoyed the rant!