Liked Michael Tsai – Blog – Meet the New Dropbox

I’ve enjoyed dropbox for a long time, but has become less useful to me first stopping the hosting web pages and then when the school network where I worked blocked it. I now use O365 OneDrive for syncing files from home to work quite happily.  I’ve quite a few aliased  setting files and the like sitting in dropbox, but they are only used from my home mac now. One or two drafts action send text from my phone to dropbox but nothing very important.

I think I’ll be trying to tidy up and drop dropbox over the summer holidays.

Some of the quotes in the linked post drip with sarcasm.

Liked Quick Fix — a vending machine for likes and followers – Raspberry Pi (Raspberry Pi)

Art installation and social commentary from maker Dries Depoorter, with a Pi, and Arduino, and a nicely finished enclosure.

Quick Fix — a vending machine for likes and followers

Quick Fix is a vending machine (and art installation) that sells social media likes and followers. Drop in a coin, enter your social media account name, and an army of fake accounts will like or follow you

 

sounds like fun on several levels.

Liked Sign In with Apple

This is one of the most interesting announcements from WWDC for me. Aaron Parecki wrote a detailed technical post for Okta about it, as well as a post on his blog:
Sign In with Apple is a good thing for users! This means apps will no longer be able to force you to log in with your Facebook account t…

Liked Pl@ntNet is the world’s best social network (Quartz)

The only that will make you feel better every time you use it.

Pl@ntNet is the world’s best social network is an interesting article and leads to a useful looking app.

Pl@ntNet is a plant identifier that combines algorithmic and social tools to identify plants.

An algorithm matches the digital image against a massive plant database and presents its best guesses as to what type of plant it is. The user who submitted the original image picks from a list of the most likely candidates, and ranks the probability the image is a match on a five-star scale. The community then vets each image, validating the identification or suggesting a new one.

The post has lots of interesting angles on the possible future of social networks, the indieweb and a nice personal touch. Highly recommended.

Last week I crowd sourced a flower identification, I ran the same image through Pl@ntNet this morning and had confirmation of the conclusion ‘we’ had reached1.

I made a couple more tests on the app and it seems to work really well. My one problem was that submitting photos uses the location you are at at the time of submission, not where I took the image (as far as I can see). Often I want to take a picture and bring it home to identify. I don’t want to give the impression that a Scottish hill flower is at home in Glasgow city! I can of course just id flowers without uploading them but the organisation wants people to add to the collection in the name of citizen science.

I’d recommend the app itself too, it seems to work very well, could be useful for outdoor learning and Pl@ntNet’s practices and principles sound great: open and thoughtful.

fn1. It took me a long time to get to the obvious, Wood Sorrel, as I found them half way up a mountain and couldn’t see the giveaway leaves.
Liked Jeremy Ruston on Twitter (Twitter)

“@nimble_monkey @davewiner @TiddlyWiki Indeed, TiddlyWiki is a rare web applications that is literally serverless (or can be). I did find it quite bemusing to watch the term get co-opted for things that were only conceptually serverless”