I like Flickr’s style:

we want to get photos and video into and out of the system in as many ways as we can: from the web, from mobile devices, from the users’ home computers and from whatever software they are using to manage their content. And we want to be able to push them out in as many ways as possible: on the Flickr website, in RSS feeds, by email, by posting to outside blogs or ways we haven’t thought of yet. What else are we going to use those smart refrigerators for?

About Flickr

I’ve just made a wee ‘blog’ from my flickr photos with the tag fblog: fBlog. It is only one webpage, not really a blog, but it didn’t take long. Sitting on my Raspberry Pi.

I do wonder if someone could make a clever flickr app that would mimic the best parts of instagram…

Liked Jonomancer — Don't Lie To Me About Web 2.0 (accordion-druid.tumblr.com)
“First there was web 1.0, which was, like, geocities pages and stuff, and it was decentralized. Then there was web 2.0, which was the centralized silos of social media - facebook, twitter, etc. Now Web3 is gonna re-decentralize everything by letting you own your own data on the blockchain…” No! Stop there! Web 2.0 was not social media! You’re rewriting history that’s less than 20 years old! Web 2.0 was:...

My own memory (and blog) tells me Web 2.0 was blogs, wikis, delicious, flickr & rss before it was twitter & facebook. I remember thinking it was the power to pull and aggregate without a great deal of technical know how that was exciting. Back in 2007 I didn’t welcome Facebook. I am pretty pleased with my forsight:

Facebook seems fine, fun etc but it misses the serendipity and easy linking and mashing of data. From my, admittedly very limited experience, it seems you can pull information into facebook but not get too much out.

Although Facebook seems neither fine or fun nowadays.

More from Jonomancer

if you want to make the dream of “buy your Minecraft skin as an NFT and bring it with you to wear in Fortnight!” work (why is this the example every article uses?) you would need to get all the games involved to decide to implement equivalent items, or some kind of framework of item portability, and if you could do that then you wouldn’t need the blockchain!

Jonomancer — Don’t Lie To Me About Web 2.0

It doesn’t seem that web3 will solve our problem fast.

For me Flickr still provides a great example of an open-silo. Flickr not owned by users (although I am happy to pay for my bit), but makes it easy to share, license, mashup and remix in what I think is web 2.0 fashion.

A year ago yesterday I posted  2020 in a photo which was the result of a ds106 daily create. I ran my video of a year’s flickr photos through and script that averaged them and a slitscan processing process. Details on that post.

I decided to try the process with this years. I am not sure if the results are interesting or not. I did enjoy the process. This years photos stopped in October.

Here is the video again

and the results:

Here is the montage of all the pictures. I wonder if there are any other ways to play with the years set?

Since 2014 I’ve been making “movies” with my flickr photos for the year. I make them with a script which downloads the years photos puts them together into a movie and, use to, add music. The Music bit is broken (https) so I downloaded some manually.

This year pretty much stopped in October, then I got covid in November and have not been out much since.

I also average the photos ( below) and montage them for the featured image. This year I made a version of the script to download wee square images for the montage (average & montage scripts here).

I enjoy both the process and watching my photos flickr by. I like the fact that I can easily tweek bit of the script or run the video creation again quickly to try out different speeds, music etc.

I just paid my annual Flickr pro fee. Very happy to do it. I like taking pictures although I don’t think of myself as a photographer. I am not really interested in the technical aspects. I use photos in the same way as blogging. To think about something, or note it, remember it, share it, or collect it for later. A diary or commonplace if you like.

I was also really pleased to see Flickr’s blog around it’s continuing support for Creative Commons and the announcement of the Flickr Foundation.

We believe the establishment of a non-profit Flickr Foundation will combine with Flickr to properly preserve and care for the Flickr Commons archive, support Commons members to collaborate in a true 21st-century Commons, and plan for the very long-term health and longevity of the entire Flickr collection. We’re also in the early stages of imagining other educational and curatorial initiatives to highlight and share the power of photography for decades to come.

The other thing I love about Flickr is it’s API. I am no more a programmer than I am a photographer. But I have had a lot of fun with the Flickr api.

One of the reasons I’ve managed to play with this API is its consistency. Other APIs I’ve used with have gone away, changed or added authentication too difficult for me to grasp. Given that I use them occasionally I am often flummoxed by changes. I only notice then when something that worked stops working.

What I love about Flickr is then threefold: a solid and consistent service that I pay for, the api(solid & constant too) and Creative Commons I get for free.

Flickr’s future has been in doubt a few times since I started in 2004, Interface changes caused some consternation. Flickr has managed to continue when other services have gone. I hope I’ll be paying for it for a good few more years.

 

Replied to

The sky is grey here today so I took a trip through my flickr. Modified a script to pull down my photos flickr thinks is blue.

There is nothing I could see in the flickr api to filter colours as there is in the search but I noticed the url for the search contains text=&color_codes=7 so I added that in. Sees to have worked.

Not because my photos are in anyway professional, but because of the wonderful things Flickr does. Flickr allows me to store and organise my photos. I can look at pictures by friends, acquaintances and all sorts of groups.

Most importantly Flickr curates and organises creative commons licensed and public domain photos. These are searchable and Flickr give access to them via an API that is useful and usable by non-professionals. I’ve had an amazing amount of fun and use (professionally as a teacher). To me Flickr is an important part of the web, I have a pro account to support that.

If you use Flickr and don’t have a pro account you can get 25% off with the code 25in2019 or use this link.