Listened Episode 003 – Interview with Ken Smith  from  Andy Sylvester from Thinking About Tools For Thought – Exploring tools and methods to help us think

Episode 3 – Interview with Ken Smith Links from today’s episode: Ken Smith’s bioKen Smith’s Old School blogAdam’s Task (book that Ken mentioned)Instant Outline that Andy Sylvester talked about creating (activism.opml)FargoLittle OutlinerDrummer

Listened to Episode 003 – Interview with Ken Smith.

I’ve read Andy Sylvester on and off for a while. He was a user of Fargo, Dave Winer’s blogging tool which I’ve used, and blogged about. Outliners are interesting, but I’ve mostly used them for blogging and todo lists. Andy is also on micro.blog.

I liked the pace of the podcast, a wee bit slower than many. It is good length too.

Ken Smith was talking about writing & thinkings tools. He started with attitude rather than tools. The idea of slowing down and paying attention to words and sentences. The specificity of someone’s language to connect with their idea. This I did not expect.

Ken mentioned ‘standing searches’ I’ve not heard of this, I am guessing a search for a word or concept that you repeat over time?

Ken then talked about, word, gDocs and outliners. The collaboration using gDocs to build conversation and community.

Ken’s use of outliners was with Dave Winer’s tools. He described moving text, your own and others, putting it beside other text to see what ideas would appear. I’ve only though or used outlines to reorganise my own words. This sounds a lot more thoughtful.

Ken talked about using the beta of Drummer. Again discussing putting pieces text together to see what happens to illustrate and test the text.

The possibilities of pulling together multiple outlines from different folk might be a way for building small(?) temporary communities and civic space around an idea.

I was interested in the bookmarks in Drummer, I spend a fair bit of time reviewing my old posts. And thinking of how I access them. This gave me some more ideas.

It did make me think of the way I review my blog, via my On this Day page, random browsing and searching by month, ignoring the year.

The whole short podcast, which I’ve listened to 3 times, had lots to think about. Ken and Andy were talking about using these tools in a much deeper way than I use them.

I am also playing with TiddlyWiki for planning learning for my class, and thinking about how to gather learning data differently. These ideas should feed in there.

I am certainly going to subscribe to the podcast and read the previous episodes.

Listened Microcast #087 — Back in the game! by Doug BelshawDoug Belshaw from Doug Belshaw's Thought Shrapnel
In this microcast, I go through three interesting links from my saved list on Pocket.

Nice to hear Doug again particularly in micro format. I do love a microcast. Lots of podcasts, especially 2 or 3 hosts chatting I find a bit long. I’d rather queueup a few shorter ones for a commute.

Listened BBC Radio Scotland - Scotland Outdoors, Treachery, Sex and Death - The Fascinating World of Rock Pools with Adam Nicolson from BBC
Mark Stephen visits author Adam Nicolson's homemade rock pools on the Morvern Peninsula.

Really enjoyed this one. Some amazing stories of crab sex & the shorey shore-thing. I was left wondering why Adam Nicolson made rock pools rather than observe pre existing ones? I think I might get the book, The Sea is Not Made of Water: Life Between the Tides.

Listened David Winer from guykawasaki.com
I’m Guy Kawasaki, and this is Remarkable People. This episode’s remarkable guest is David Winer. Dave is a programmer, entrepreneur, writer, and to some, a gadfly. The word ‘gadfly,’ by the way, means “An annoying person, especially one who provokes others into action by criticism.” That’s Dave, all right.

Listened: David Winer – Guy Kawasaki

Really good chat. Covering the birth of blogs, rss, podcasting and outliners.

Talking about the idea that apple networking, if better, could have made the web unnecessary:

David Winer: We had to give up the GUI. We went from having all this great user interface standards to the web, which had no user interface standards.

When I started using computers, a mac 475 and system 7 point something I really found the standardised UI a huge benefit.

Guy Kawasaki: …. but it seems like Apple and Spotify and Amazon, they’re now trying to gate-keep podcasting.

I’ve been podcasting since 2005 and really worry that the medium is being commercialised. Dave Winer was more pragmatic.

Interesting too to compare Dave’s podcasting routine with Guy Kawasaki’s extensive editing:

David Winer: I open up my iPhone, I turn on the Voice Memo app, talk for a while, I email that to myself, I upload it to a server, I put it on my blog. Goodbye.

The wee bit of audio was grabbed by Castro.

Listened Episode 46: Lessons from Scotland by The Impact Podcast from anchor.fm
The OECD has published its long-awaited report into Scotland’s Curriculum for Excellence (CfE). With Curriculum for Wales sharing many similarities with CfE, Jane and Finola discuss whether Wales can avoid some of the issues raised by the OECD.

Given I am pretty unlikely to read the whole of the OECD report on CfE I found this podcast very interesting. It also encouraged me to read at least the executive summary in the holidays. The hosts discuss CfE from a Welsh perspective of following in the footsteps of CfE and avoiding the pitfalls.

Both the report and the podcast hosts made the point about lack of time being a main barrier to staff involvement in curriculum development.

One of the areas discussed was the difficulty in communication the vision of CfE or Curriculum for Wales. This leads me to think a good way, given teachers are time poor, would be a series of podcasts which can be consumed while commuting or dish washing (if anyone washes dishes by hand any more). I certainly found this podcast easier to digest than I would reading the whole report.

Sidenote, the podcast is on spotify/anchor. I spent a bit of time playing with anchor as it developed but lost touch as it pivoted one time too many.

Listened Ep 9: Something for a Monday: Exploring the beauty and authenticity of informal professional learning conversations, finding community and belonging through #TeachMeet networks from garlands.podbean.com
In this episode I talk with Mags Amond, a retired post-primary school teacher and PhD candidate, about her research on a form of informal continuous professional development among teachers all over the world.  It is called TEACHMEET where teaching professi...

Very interested to listen to this one. Mags’ phd on TeachMeet covers some interesting territory.

I’d love to hear more on the transitions to online only events. I was surprised to hear they feel authentic. I’d also like to hear more about the links to open.

I’ve been out of theTeachMeet loop for a while, as far as I know they have all but vanished from the Scottish scene. It was exciting to get caught up.

 

Listened 100: A Conversation About Micro.blog, with special guest Patrick Rhone by Micro MondayMicro Monday from monday.micro.blog
A special episode to mark a milestone for the Micro Monday podcast. Manton and Jean talk with Patrick Rhone, who previously appeared on Episode 4. We take a look at how Micro.blog has evolved and where it’s going, focusing on these questions: How important are independent blogs, considering what w...

Listened: micro Monday ep 100

@jean talking to @patrickrhone & @manton

Patrick was so spot on about the humanness of micro.blog This was an especially delightful episode.

Listened Micro Monday - 89: @maique, photographer, new dad from monday.micro.blog
Maique joins us this week from Lisbon. He worked for two decades as a photojournalist before becoming an independent photographer. He talks about the challenges of doing photography when you can’t travel, and how he copes as a new dad with the flood of baby photos. We also chatted about the upcomi...

Well that was nice. It is comforting to hear a professional photographer talk about the value of non professional photos in the A Day in The Life microblog challenge.