Listened Slow Teaching with Jamie Thom from Becoming Educated

Jamie Thom is a full time English Teacher, host of the TES English Teaching Podcast and author of ‘Slow Teaching: finding calm, clarity and impact in the classroom’. Jamie is also set to rele…

I enjoyed listening to this episode on the way home tonight. I’m interested in other ‘slow places’ (food,  The Daily Stillness for example) so this was a good listen.

I am not sure why I’ve not listened to this Scottish Educational Podcast before. Now subbed. Hope to listen to the episodes with David Cameron (the provocative education one) soon.

Listened GIFs as Blackface from Glimmer

Anil Dash: What I’m saying is, sometimes that machine is making us do something that replicates the systemic racism of the world around us. I don’t think anybody intends that, but maybe by talking about it, what we can do is encourage each other to be a little bit more thoughtful, a little bit more mindful about which images we use, whose images we use, and the way we use them. And if we do that, we can keep the machines and the software and the technology from undermining other people’s ability to trust in our good intent when we send them a message.

Really interesting discussions. I’ve messed around a lot with gifs, mainly making them, I like their use for examining moments, “art” and just playing with the tools. I’ve never, afair, entered into the world of reaction gifs. I’ve used giphy for the odd daft experiment, but that is as far as it goes.

Listened Tes Scotland Podcast, Episode 4: Chris Smith from acast

Former teacher of the year Chris Smith tells us about the quality every teacher needs, bombing in front of 600 pupils, the perfect class size, how everyone can succeed in maths, why more teachers should open up about their own mental health, and the false dichotomy between ‘traditional’ and ‘progressive’ education.

Henry Hepburn, @Henry_Hepburn interviews Chris Smith, @aap03102, This was a pretty delightful listen for all sorts of reasons. Chris shows a healthy dislike of inservice days;-)

I particularly like the idea that his subject, maths, could be of interest to pupils in itself. Lessons, and activities don’t always need be part of a project, although Chris talked about great ones, or in preparation for a career.

Listened Microcast #081 – Anarchy, Federation, and the IndieWeb from Doug Belshaw’s Thought Shrapnel

This week’s microcast answers a question from John Johnston about federation and the IndieWeb.

This is a really interesting listen, Doug takes a philosophical view of the IndieWeb and compares it to federation. I’m going to listen through again before I posts some thoughts.

It was of note I discovered the podcast via a webmention on the post where I asked the question.

Greg McVerry responded in kind Politics of Plumbing: IndieWeb and Federation and Arron’s response to that make interesting listening and reading too.

Doug’s time in answering my question is very much appreciated.

Listened Microcast #080 – Redecentralize and MozFest from Doug Belshaw’s Thought Shrapnel

A microcast about my experiences at two events last weekend.

Microcast #080 – Redecentralize and MozFest | Doug Belshaw’s Thought Shrapnel

An interesting and wide ranging podcast Doug.

I liked the concept of seams rather than seamless technology. Likewise I’ve found a bit of friction useful. Slows things down and gives you time to think.

The decentralised session sounds like an interesting way to run a session, it is, it might be too easy for experienced confident speakers to take over such a session, so perhaps needs a fairly egoless leader. Sounds so like yours went very well.

I think you asked for microcast suggestions? I’d be interested on your take on the IndieWeb as compared to federation.

Listened Microcast #078 — Values-based organisations from Doug Belshaw’s Thought Shrapnel

This microcast covers ethics in decision-making for technology companies and (related!) some recent purchases I’ve made.

Delighted to see Doug’s microcast in his RSS feed. I also love Doug’s wrestling with his technology stack. Over the years it has gone back and forwards and is always fascinating to read Doug’s thoughts on the whys and wherefores.

Listened Lurgan Schools: The Differences We Share

For the latter part of the 20th century, Northern Ireland, officially part of the United Kingdom but sharing an island with the Republic of Ireland, saw violence between the nationalists (mostly Roman Catholic background) and unionists (mostly Protestant background). The Good Friday Agreement of 199…

I listened to the huffduffed version of the youtube: Lurgan Schools: The Differences We Share. I do hope that politicians watch this.