Replied to Robert Jones on Twitter: "I'm becoming increasingly sentimental as I get older. I have a real fondness for hawthorn, probably because hawthorn trees bounded two sides of our garden when I was growing up.… https://t.co/S9w4hKOw0N" (twitter.com)

‪The hawthorn is a lovely tree. Every spring I think blackthorn is my favourite and the the hawthorn comes along. There seems to be even more than usual this spring. ‬

Audio from my conversation with Dr. Ian Guest, (@IaninSheffield), yesterday evening is now on Radio Edutalk:

Radio Edutalk 13-03-19 Ian Guest “Exploring teachers’ professional development with Twitter”.

Ian’s approach to research is really interesting and he makes you think more than once about things you take for granted. #EDUtalk.

Replied to @mrkrndvs (Twitter)

“@davecormier Sorry Dave, I wasn't implying that you rejected my comments, more that Akismet and I have different opinions on comments 😬”

Akismet and I have different opinions on comments

After I finished laughing I realised this it telling about our online conversations and being defensive as default.

“BEST. PD. EVER!” Some teachers make bold claims for the way that Twitter supports their professional development, yet research into this area is rather limited. This study sought to gain a better understanding of the practices involved and the part that Twitter plays. It uses a sociomaterial sensibility informed by actor-network theory (ANT) to unravel the complex webs of relations which form, break apart and reform when knowledge practices are enacted in the mediated arena of Twitter.
To explore this rich but messy environment, I evoke the spirit of the Parisian flâneur to develop an ethnographic approach I refer to as ‘flânography.’

from: Exploring teachers’ professional development with Twitter: A sociomaterial analysis – Sheffield Hallam University Research Archive

Ian Guest’s phd should make for fascinating reading. I’ve followed along on his blog as best I could. The idea of twitter as CPD is a popular one that needs the sort of examination that Ian carried out.

We have interviewed Ian on Radio Edutalk about his phd back in 2016 and I am looking forward to talking to him again soon. He also published audio of some of his research interviews on Edutalk: CPDin140.

Since I have an on this day page on my blog I’ve been finding old me interesting.

Yesterday I notice quite a few end of year reviews published on the last day of the year1.

Blogging highlights 3, followed 1 & 2 in 2006 but focused on the blogging my pupils (primary 6 ~10yr olds) carried out that year.

The links go to the internet archive now. Images and some links were broken but I enjoyed reading them.

I was surprised at the comments on the posts, from adults, pupils at other schools and classmates. At the time the idea of an audience and conversation was one of the main reasons I had pupils in my class blogging. We were posting photos, video, microcasting and writing poems.

It seems harder to get comments on pupils blog now. I admit I’ve not commented outside my own class lately.

This was the year before I was on twitter. A lot of the online conversation about what happens in classrooms has moved to there. While a lot of this is interesting and valuable it has mostly removed pupils from the publishing process 2. This is I believe a loss.

  1. I was thinking of writing one for 2018 but got lost in following these old posts.
  2. see also ‘School social media has been terrible at engaging parents’ | Tes News by Susan Ward
Replied to Re: Something Weird is Happening on Twitter Right Now by Aaron DavisAaron Davis (Read Write Collect)

Even better Bill is if we had such conversations from the comfort of our own backyard using bridgy and webmenbtions, rather than someone else’s playground?

An interesting Rabbit hole, Arron is replying to Something Weird is Happening on Twitter Right Now by Bill Ferriter who quotes this Dean Shareski tweet. The twitter thread discuses using twitter for conversation rather than promotion/retweeting/liking. 

This is the problem micro.blog set out to solve. So far I think it has done so, I’ve had some very good conversations there. There are not likes and retweets on micro.blog. These are mentioned negatively on the thread Dean sparked. Micro.blog make it as easy to post and comment as twitter.

Someone on micro.blog mentioned the other day that blogging superstars joined but didn’t stick (or words to that effect). Lack of reposts and visible likes makes the platform a bit more democratic.

The only thing I miss on micro.blog is the communities that exists on twitter. If there was a micro.blog for educators that would be very interesting.  I’ve some thoughts on how this could happen, but finding it slightly hard to make them into an intelligible post.

Replied to Susan Ward on Twitter (Twitter)

“Why social media ain’t all that when it comes to engaging parents and how schools can unlock its real potential
https://t.co/mRBaxMi5xc @ITLWorldwide @SBCEducation1 @DigitalscotNews @DigiLearnScot @Wilson722Wilson @TESScotland @TeacherToolkit @TeamSCEL @pedagoo”

Great stuff Susan. I wonder if blogging is a better approach to sharing than twitter. Easier for pupils to be part of the process? I know twitter is seem as simpler but I worry about encouraging pupils to a service which may not haver their best interests at heart.

Reposted Frances Bell on Twitter (Twitter)

“@suebecks @suewatling @catherinecronin @ambrouk @LTE_Hull Could I gently encourage you Sue to publish your reflection as a blog post where it can be commented and found, possibly curated in future? 🙂 It’s great having this conversation on the Twitter stream but it’s more likely to disappear under the surface than bob along on top :)”

I think this every day about a tweet, so I am posting to my blog.