Replied to a tweet by an author (Twitter)

Thanks for the affirmation, Ian, currently swimming thru tons of #TeachMeet research data (yep, same dna as Pedagoo, BrewEd, CampEd). Key features: non-hierarchical, open, peer-to-peer. So far, *sharing* is the definitive value emerging from this global appreciative inquiry; tbc.

Along with avoiding @ewanmcintosh’s “keynote-speaker-sponsor-driven” & keeping to
@magsamond’s “non-hierarchical, open, peer-to-peer” I think early #teachmeet principals of everyone being willing to participate & serendipity of random were interesting ways to change dynamics.

Replied to a tweet by an author ( )
If Twitter killed the RT and the # it could only be better for the world. They didn't make this monster, they just did what the monster wanted for 10 years, in the hope of making millions. They've done that, perhaps now they need shutting down.

@everythingabili See Micro.blog, likes are private, no follower counts,  RT not available: What’s the difference between Micro.blog and Twitter? – Micro.blog Help.

Hey Pressto! Conference 2020 – A WordPress and ClassicPress conference which happens only on Twitter  #HeyPresstoConf20 organised by Phil Barker (@philbarker) and Pat Lockley  (@pgogy).

It seems to follow on from the 2020 PressEdConf Conference ( I took part in the 2018 one)

Plenty of interesting ideas, for example,  the strong mention of classic WordPress and the Environmental Policy.

A while back I wondered about participating in PressEd using a blog and bridgy that might be an interesting way to take IndieWeb ideas to Hey Pressto.

Replied to Aaron Davis on Twitter (Twitter)
“@johnjohnston @IaninSheffield @Sfm36 @Miss_Anderson @athole @StephenReidEdu @IanStuart66 @claganach I am a POSSE kinda guy to be honest John. I will often carve a response on my site and then either send it via SNAP or copy it and then manually add the syndication link. Documented much of my workflow here https://t.co/8pmpBCxrPD”

POSSE is best, but I sometimes knee jerk or fire a quick tweet & then think that would be best on my site. I am also lazy & inconsistent. Some real gold in Managing Content Through Canonical Links, thanks

Replied to ‘Expert Twitter’ Only Goes So Far. Bring Back Blogs by an authoran author ( )
What is sad and confusing are the people who publish great threads while leaving their WP.com site lying dormant. At the very least, users could copy the unrolled thread and past the content in a space they somewhat manage and have the ability to update?

I was joshing about that last night:

re: I have no time to write a blog

There are a ton of great resources and ideas for teaching zooming past on twitter at the moment. It would be great for some to go to a slower stream or garden.

Replied to Sarah Clark on Twitter (Twitter)
“@johnjohnston @Miss_Anderson @athole @StephenReidEdu @IanStuart66 @claganach I have no time to write a blog ”

Can’t argue with that, but I will 😉 Mine saves me time, ’cause I can refer to, writing posts especially one I don’t publish let me think through things and a lot of my posts are tweets too, like this one. I am sad when resources are only shared on twitter and lost in the stream.

Replied to Athole on Twitter (Twitter)
“I’ve not stopped working in 13 weeks. Like many professions, teaching doesn’t fit into a 9-5 schedule. But online it’s 24/7. And I’m not learning classical Kazoo, or how to paint the Mona Lisa or even getting all the quality time with my kids I should be. 2/4”

‪We are in as someone smart said in different boats in the storm (& some of us are only at the edge) so advice prolly useless. But I’d give up on the 24/7: being with your kid & wife, hugs, fresh air & nature are not indulgence but essential maintenance needed to do your work. ‬

Replied to Athole on Twitter (Twitter)
“So many teachers I follow are ALWAYS teachers. It’s quite draining to be honest. Some of the best teachers I’ve ever seen working with kids were NOT teachers. I often think it’s healthier to think ‘what would I do (and think) if I were not a teacher?’ Especially right now.”

I guess we all show a slice of our lives online. Some folk keep the slice narrow, others widen it a bit.