There are 17 posts found on this site published on June 13

12 thoughts on “On This Day

  1. Once you have a few years of blogging in your archives, you thus have some history (doh). And I made a little plugin to make it more visible, to generate a list of previous year’s post published on the current day.

    Just peek at my own page using this.

    It all started with a tweet from John Johnston.

    Liked: Remembering the past through photos: https://t.co/T4CriwyOaB— john johnston (@johnjohnston) January 13, 2019

    https://platform.twitter.com/widgets.js

    John has an On This Day page that generates a list of his own posts published on the current day. I found it interesting, and guessed he might have used a plugin. I looked at two I found in the WordPress repository, but they did not do the trick, so I took the obvious step of asking John in twitter.

    I like that feature- is it a plugin or John Johnston magic code?— Alan Levine (@cogdog) January 13, 2019

    https://platform.twitter.com/widgets.js

    Not surprisingly it was something he wrote himself. Not surprisingly, he shared it.

    Both 🙂 very simple plugin most of code borrowed from stackexchange. https://t.co/e3iKJ25Xa7 I intended to extend to work with date from post or param at some point. I find the results fascinating.— john johnston (@johnjohnston) January 13, 2019

    https://platform.twitter.com/widgets.js

    I gave John’s plugin a try on this blog, but ran into some problems- in the editor, the shortcode was outputting to the top of the screen (I think it might need a (!is_admin()) conditional to make sure it’s not running in the dashboard?) and also, on my page, it was inserting content at the top of the page, above the content I had written (guessing because it hooks the main query).

    So I rolled up my sleeves and coded my own, now available as the Posted Today plugin. It provides a shortcode that could be used anywhere in your WordPress site (post, page, widget?) but mainly the intent is for a Page.

    Adding [postedtoday] is all a page needs to generate output like mine a listing of all posts on the current day (like today’s show all past posts for January 15). I added post excerpts and some logic to group together posts in the same day (because heck sometimes I post 4 times a day) and added excerpts as well.

    The output has CSS classes so you can set some design (like I remove bullets from the years, and change line height, font size for excerpts).

    I was going to blog a screenshot yo show today’s output, but realized I had designed a better means. After getting the plugin to actually work (meaning not barfing errors because I dropped a semi-colon!) I started thinking of options for the shortcode. Including the month and day like means with [postedtoday month="1" day="15"] I can create a page for posts on an arbitrary date (see example) if I really want to share what I have written on January 15s – hey it was the birthdate of the TRU Collector SPLOT.

    And one more enhancement, if you don’t want the excerpts (like maybe in sidebar text widget, you can do this with another shortcode [postedtoday excerpt="0"].

    I’m pretty impressed 😉

    And this got me thinking yesterday, as I was working on an eCampus Ontario project launching in edX plus some other thoughts trying to help my wife figure out things for her course hosted in Moodle. These systems have to try to include the functionality everybody might want, that’s how they get ginormous (and full of menus, options to wade through).

    And while they might be extensible via plugins too (that only a server admin can add), it’s different from WordPress in that I, as a site owner, can find or write (and share) my own small extensions to do what I want. It’s much closer, IMHO, to the original dream of the web than dream of something like MS Office (where I still everytime fail to find out how to format tabs).

    Featured Image: My Photo Made the April Calendar flickr photo by cogdogblogshared into the public domain using Creative Commons Public Domain Dedication (CC0)

    If this kind of stuff has any value, please support me monthly on Patreon or a one time PayPal kibble toss

  2. Hello John,
    I Hope all is well with you, your family and friends and students.
    I saw the post below by Karl Ellinger and thought of you – thought of you with lovingkindness.
    -Dan

    Karl Ellinger & Elisabeth Geishauser
    (Dan note: re: SuperCard FlameThrower Roadster), (thinking about John Johnston’s group upload/download Supercard Script library)

    Karl Ellinger & Elisabeth Geishauser

         Hello Mark,

    I do hope that you have been spared from Long-COVID,
    as your message reads well and interesting.
         So, I learned about your projects to create internet-enabled tools
    based on SC. Thanks to SuperTalk, presentations tailored to
    specific needs can be created, which is also desirable for the
    Internet.
         However, you note that the browser-plugin project was poorly
    managed in the past, showed errors, and proved to be unstable.
    Moreover, the “server-side tool” was considered too slow.
         You took over its source code years later, fixed stumbling bugs,
    and accelerated the interpretation many times over. Simple website
    demos were made possible, but unfortunately, they stumbled with
    heavy data transfer.
         Then the funding stalled, and further investments are needed
    regarding source code and publishing rights.
         As an observer who was only peripherally involved but
    understood the problems, you explain them in-depth now – thank
    you! I am also interested to read about your collaboration with –

         David Coggeshall

    Hello David, I also thank you very much for your interesting
    comment!
         I gather from it that you generated interactive SVG web pages
    together with Mark using SuperTalk.
         You also used the program to produce components of websites
    and created large area maps with JavaScript for the Google Maps JS
    API, some of which you wrote using SuperTalk.
         I acknowledge all of this as commendable. I am impressed and
    express my interest in the details, as I am amazed that SuperTalk
    can be integrated into other programming languages.

         I look forward to hearing from you
         and wish you both all the best!

         Karl

    • Hi Dan,
      I am well thanks you, hope you are too. I saw the thread on the SC list, you have encouraged me to reply now:-)

      I alway though SC was a good fit for updating web content in various ways.

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