Replied to a tweet by Alan Levine (Twitter)

I might need a WordPress plugin than converts all links to run them through the Wayback Machine. Mansy days it feels like 90% of my blogged links are dead.

I used amber for a while & stopped for reasons i can’t recall. Used the archive option. Currently got a JavaScript that sorts broken links to my old, now gone school site where a lot of my early links pointed. I now use On This day, thanks Alan, to tend my links most days.

Liked a tweet by Athole (Twitter)

Found myself listening to this. A younger me. Very enthusiastic. Tripping over words to get ideas out. And John Johnston is a brilliant host. Funny and charmingly left of centre. EDUtalk was brilliant. I miss it. @ewanmcintosh and @MrSMathsWizard all get a mention. https://twitter.com/johnjohnston/status/736100282396868609

Keeping this one for the “charming” Going to have a re-listen.

Replied to Bright green, blight green, and lean green futures | Open Thinkering by Doug Belshaw (Open Thinkering | Doug Belshaw's blog)
This is Vinay’s preferred option, and the only one he thinks is scalable and realistic. It’s “numerical” by which he means quantitative, not qualitative. You simply imagine that every human being has equal right to the planet’s “material bounty”, and then divide up what’s available, and how much they can emit.

Hi Doug,

Thanks for this link, I’d not heard Vinay Gupta before. A good listen although some of the verbal style grated a bit.  I’d heard the idea of fair shares, in relation to air miles, before and liked it. Possibly because I very seldom fly;-)

Replied to a tweet by Sarah Clark (Twitter)

Available in glow now. Go check this out...I think it can have such and impact https://twitter.com/microsoftedu/status/1432401352165142528

Been doing something similar, but simpler, for a few years, with voice memos & notes. No auto data gathering but self assessment. Valuable.

https://johnjohnston.info/blog/reading-self-assessment-workflows-update/

Listened Episode 003 – Interview with Ken Smith  from  Andy Sylvester from Thinking About Tools For Thought – Exploring tools and methods to help us think

Episode 3 – Interview with Ken Smith Links from today’s episode: Ken Smith’s bioKen Smith’s Old School blogAdam’s Task (book that Ken mentioned)Instant Outline that Andy Sylvester talked about creating (activism.opml)FargoLittle OutlinerDrummer

Listened to Episode 003 – Interview with Ken Smith.

I’ve read Andy Sylvester on and off for a while. He was a user of Fargo, Dave Winer’s blogging tool which I’ve used, and blogged about. Outliners are interesting, but I’ve mostly used them for blogging and todo lists. Andy is also on micro.blog.

I liked the pace of the podcast, a wee bit slower than many. It is good length too.

Ken Smith was talking about writing & thinkings tools. He started with attitude rather than tools. The idea of slowing down and paying attention to words and sentences. The specificity of someone’s language to connect with their idea. This I did not expect.

Ken mentioned ‘standing searches’ I’ve not heard of this, I am guessing a search for a word or concept that you repeat over time?

Ken then talked about, word, gDocs and outliners. The collaboration using gDocs to build conversation and community.

Ken’s use of outliners was with Dave Winer’s tools. He described moving text, your own and others, putting it beside other text to see what ideas would appear. I’ve only though or used outlines to reorganise my own words. This sounds a lot more thoughtful.

Ken talked about using the beta of Drummer. Again discussing putting pieces text together to see what happens to illustrate and test the text.

The possibilities of pulling together multiple outlines from different folk might be a way for building small(?) temporary communities and civic space around an idea.

I was interested in the bookmarks in Drummer, I spend a fair bit of time reviewing my old posts. And thinking of how I access them. This gave me some more ideas.

It did make me think of the way I review my blog, via my On this Day page, random browsing and searching by month, ignoring the year.

The whole short podcast, which I’ve listened to 3 times, had lots to think about. Ken and Andy were talking about using these tools in a much deeper way than I use them.

I am also playing with TiddlyWiki for planning learning for my class, and thinking about how to gather learning data differently. These ideas should feed in there.

I am certainly going to subscribe to the podcast and read the previous episodes.

Replied to 1/623 (CogDogBlog)
Hi. There has not been too much nostalgia posting here lately (well actually not much at all, so there). Maybe last June? But who cares if I feel like dipping into my tech past, it’s there. I…

Hi Alan,
One of the first 623 sites! Blows my mind. Way beyond early adopter.

There should be a badge or medal.

Replied to Purge your Mac of OneDrive (Tech, tales and imagery)
It doesn’t take much experience with Microsoft’s OneDrive to learn that it is an unmitigated car-crash: it purports to be a productivity tool that makes it possible to share files quickly and easily.

Hi Nick, When I read this I was going to let you know that OneDrive had been rock solid for a while for me. I use a mac in school and at home. I didn’t get to write the comment.
On Monday arriving in school I opened my daily plans, a set of txt files in OneDrive, to find that they had not synced from Sunday at home. No plans 😖

Replied to A tweet by Blair Minchin (Twitter)

Data.

Boiling down children, human beings, to data.

Data on maths and literacy.

That’s what league tables do.

They don’t demotivate me because I know they paint a tiny, incomplete picture of a school, a smaller one of a class and a microscopic view of an individual child. https://twitter.com/mark_mclaughlin/status/1428405387355623425

Data, can be done differently.

Home

I keep being pulled by this site. Cc @IaninSheffield