I started to write the odd weekly recap of my view of micro.blog and it misfired in a very confusing, to me, way. The post went through to the micro.blog app as a titled post. I had kept the character count down to under 280. The post was a status post. It should have appeared in all of its glory on micro.blog.

I looked at it for a while and then headed over to the micro.blog slack community to bother @manton. Only after that I looked again and thought it through.

My script that removes titles in RSS from my status posts if the post <280 chars didn’t account for emoji being counted as multiple chars. It wasn’t till I’d posted to slack that I figured this out.

I’ve figure out how to work round this, replacing emoji with one character using a slight change to this function from @mdhughes. I’ll probably have to wait until next week to post another recap and see if it really will work.

I’ve updated this gist: functions that have do with micro.blog and microblogging that live in my child theme’s functions.php

It is getting time for a rethink of how the tubes are connected here, I need to simplify a little I think.

Replied to INTERTEXTrEVOLUTION by Greg McVerryGreg McVerry (jgregorymcverry.com)

Reduced post to micro.blog by trying to be intentional as I play. Assume folks who want know have me in readers. And syndicated replies or threaded conversations from other networks make little sense.
Wonder if this is better approach of if all the content goes everywhere.

Hi Greg,

i think it is a better way. I am trying to do that here. My main RSS feed doesn’t have status formatted post. Only post categorised micro go to microblog (I think I’ll change to just using categories soon).  The category for this post ‘reactions’ doesn’t go anywhere, unless I forget to take off publicise to google or post to Twitter via The friction should help with the intentionality.

It gets complicated as replies through micro.blog don’t, as yet, get posted here and replies here don’t point, AFAIK, at a particular micro.blog post.

Liked You’re Not Cool Enough For Micro.blog | Greg Morris by Chris AldrichChris Aldrich (BoffoSocko)

•a web host,
•a Twitter replacement,
•a Twitter client that allows you to own your own data,
•a Instagram replacement,
•a microcasting platform,
•a full blogging platform,
•a new, well-curated community with a strong code of conduct,
•a customized feed reader for a new community,
•a syndication platform for one’s personal blog,
•a low barrier entryway to having your own IndieWeb-capable blog on your own domain.,
•a first class IndieWeb citizen with support for multiple types of posts, IndieAuth, Webmention, Micropub, and Microsub.

👍 Liked  @c, @chrisaldrich Chris Aldrich’s great list of micro.blog purposes. Micro.blog has been difficult to describe. At the moment I am not using it as a replacement service for twitter or Instagram but in addition to or a way of owning and enriching these services.

I am finding micro.blog a really interesting community.

From an educational POV the most positive experience and the one that I would like to see replicated (in Glow and elsewhere) is #DS106.

DS106 influences the way I think about ScotEduBlogs and the way I built two Glow Blogging Bootcamps 1.

In particular these sites aggregate participants content but encourage any comments and feedback to go on the originators site.

Micro.blog is making me rethink this a little, there you can comment on micro.blog (the same as the blog hub in DS106) and that comment gets sent as a webmention to the originators site. This makes thinks a lot easier to carry through.

Micro.blog also provides the equivalent of the #ds106 twitter hashtag but keeps that in the same space as the hub/rss reader.

Manton recently wrote:

Micro.blog will never be that big. What we need instead of another huge social network is a bunch of smaller platforms that are built on blogs and the open web.

from: Manton Reece – Replacing 1 billion-user platforms

Which made me think.

Firstly it reinforces how Manton really thinks hard about making micro.blog a brilliant place, avoiding the pitfalls of huge silos.

Secondly it speaks to idea of multiple social networks. Imagine if DS106 and ScotEdublogs where both platforms in this sense, I could join in either or both along with others using my blog to publish. I could decide which posts of mine to send to which community, and so on.

It is the same idea I’ve had for Glow blogs since I started working with them 2.

Class blogs could join in and participate in different projects.

It would be easy to start a local or national project and pull together content and conversation from across the web into one learning space. Although I’ve spoken and blogged a lot about this idea I don’t think I’ve made it stick in the minds of many Scottish educators. I wish I could.

  1. Blogging Bootcamp spring 2015 & Blogging Bootcamp #2 Autumn 2015 . I believe the potential for these sorts of educational activity is much underused in primary and secondary education. I wish I was in the position to organise and design more of these…
  2. For example: