Liked A poetry lesson by James Durran (@jdurran)James Durran (@jdurran) (James Durran)
An account of a poetry lesson, with some thoughts on efficiency, on how we treat texts and on knowledge.

efficiency in teaching is a problematic idea. Of course time and energy shouldn’t be evaporated away by gimmickry or activity with no purpose. But an element of theatre, an injection of emotion, or a playful unwrapping of ideas can be worth the time if ideas are more memorably imprinted or are more deeply understood.

Interesting post in relation to knowledge, exploratory learning. I’ll be revisiting the blog for the primary section which looks really valuable.

Liked a tweet by Juliet Robertson (Twitter)

15+ alternatives to using laminates outside https://bit.ly/36H66ht Always on the look out for good ideas here. #EYShare #EYMatters, #EYTwittertagteam, #EYFS, #EarlyYears, #TeamEarlyChildhood #EYBLUK#edutwitter #EYMaths #continuousprovision #eyideas

15+ Alternatives to Using Laminated Sheets Outside

Liked Cory Doctorow: Tech Monopolies and the Insufficient Necessity of Interoperability (Locus Online)
It’s been 150 years since a lack of coordination among new Australian states created the “middle-gauge muddle”: a nation whose railroad tracks are laid at different widths depending on which part of the country you’re in. In 150 years, no one has figured out how to make a rail car that can change its wheelbase midway through its journey and after hundreds of attempts, Australia is giving up on interoperable rolling stock. Instead, they’re tear­ing up thousands of kilometers’ worth of rail and putting down new ones.

Enjoyable read. One of the things I love about blogging is rss which provides all sorts of interoperability. Micro.blog is a marvellous example.

Liked a tweet by Sheri Edwards (Twitter)

Introduction to Web Stories (Storytime #1) https://youtu.be/MCcHkmzrIVY via @YouTube Open Source. Seems to put the creator in charge-- rather than the platform in charge of your content.

The open source and WordPress plugin make me prick up my ears. I Wonder if the open source means that the WordPress Plugin is self contained? Might be worth a test over the summer holidays.

 Coding is not ‘fun’, it’s technically and ethically complex by Walter Vannini (Aeon)

Coding is seen as fun and glamorous, but that’s a sales pitch. In reality, it’s complicated, both technically and ethically

It’s better to admit that coding is complicated, technically and ethically. Computers, at the moment, can only execute orders, to varying degrees of sophistication. So it’s up to the developer to be clear: the machine does what you say, not what you mean. More and more ‘decisions’ are being entrusted to software, including life-or-death ones: think self-driving cars; think semi-autonomous weapons; think Facebook and Google making inferences about your marital, psychological or physical status, before selling it to the highest bidder. Yet it’s rarely in the interests of companies and governments to encourage us to probe what’s going on beneath these processes.

Clear well explained short and powerful article. via both Scripting News and Memex 1.1.

Perhaps we need another term for the coding like activity than can be a lot of fun for folk that have the skills that Walter Vannini explains coders need. I have a lot of fun dabbling in AppleScript, bash and JavaScript without the discipline and study necessary to be a coder.

Kids in school can have this sort of fun too, perhaps helping in maths and in skills like problem solving, working together and practical skills. Scratch and micro:bits can be a a lot of fun in a primary classroom.

Liked Essays — Tyler Hobbs (tylerxhobbs.com)
There are so many reasons to be excited about generative art, but at the core of everything is this fundamental value: generative art is truly working with the essence of what shapes our new digital worlds. Coding is the key. Our future lives will be built with it. The artistic exploration of code and how it can be re-imagined, re-examined, and re-purposed is critical if we wish to build a healthy, human experience in the non-physical landscapes to come. Generative art is one step in that direction, and one that feels more important to me every day.

Many fascinating looking essays by a generative artist. On Instagram too.

Another fine rabbit hole found via Doug Belshaw’s Thought Shrapnel

Liked The internet consumes extraordinary amounts of energy. Here’s how we can make it more sustainable (theconversation.com)
Around 4.6 billion people use the internet every day. In fact, 350,000 tweets have been sent in the past minute. We tend to think of the internet as something ephemeral – partly thanks to terms like “web” and “cloud” – but the servers that host all that data produce huge amounts of emissions, leaving giant carbon footprints behind.

Via A sustainable web – Sceptical Scot