Liked Essays — Tyler Hobbs (tylerxhobbs.com)
There are so many reasons to be excited about generative art, but at the core of everything is this fundamental value: generative art is truly working with the essence of what shapes our new digital worlds. Coding is the key. Our future lives will be built with it. The artistic exploration of code and how it can be re-imagined, re-examined, and re-purposed is critical if we wish to build a healthy, human experience in the non-physical landscapes to come. Generative art is one step in that direction, and one that feels more important to me every day.

Many fascinating looking essays by a generative artist. On Instagram too.

Another fine rabbit hole found via Doug Belshaw’s Thought Shrapnel

Liked The internet consumes extraordinary amounts of energy. Here’s how we can make it more sustainable (theconversation.com)
Around 4.6 billion people use the internet every day. In fact, 350,000 tweets have been sent in the past minute. We tend to think of the internet as something ephemeral – partly thanks to terms like “web” and “cloud” – but the servers that host all that data produce huge amounts of emissions, leaving giant carbon footprints behind.

Via A sustainable web – Sceptical Scot

Liked On Digital Gardening, Blogs, and Knowledge (macdrifter.com)
Email is a powerful tool, but it feels like using a shovel to cut down a tree.

Macdrifter is one of my favourite mac blogs. Disappeared for a while and recently sprung back to life. I noticed through the power of RSS.

This post takes a look at digital gardening and looks at some of the elements of IndieWeb & blogging I am interested in.

Stars, favorites, reading lists,bookmarks, notes, playlists, and the whole mess of podcasts, is exhausting to keep track of, let alone keep alive and healthy.

and:

I think I want to return to this old-fashioned concept of blogging for Macdrifter. I want to worry less about “reviewing” things and more about leaving tasty breadcrumbs.

There is a nice list of blogs and blog types at the end too. Really glad to see this feed come alive again.

Caught in the Study Web – Cybernaut – Every

Much of Study Web parallels more adult and professional spaces that have emerged in the last decade—revered influencers, a bend towards materialism, and inspiration over analysis.

Really interesting post, strangely l’ve listened to some of the ‘music’ videos as background in my classroom of much younger learners.

Study Web is the space students have constructed for themselves in response to the irl system that just isn’t working. Unable to find a place or person to turn to with their academic and career anxieties, they find internet strangers—strange kin—to speak to, or simply share the same space with, online. Lacking the intrinsic inspiration to study for hours each day, online advice and group accountability provide a solution. Feeling isolated, virtual study partners create a sense of fellowship.

During lockdown I occasionally gave my class time to complete a short piece of work. Turning off my screen and playing some music, often the lofi type mentioned in the article. I wonder if having longer ‘working together’ sessions would have been helpful? Did anyone else try this sort of thing with primary pupils?

Coincidently one year ago I noted: Our Magic Box A poem written by my class in teams w hen I gave them some 5 minute intervals to write.

Link via Waxy.org

Liked The Instagram ads Facebook won't show you (Signal Messenger)
Companies like Facebook aren’t building technology for you, they’re building technology for your data. They collect everything they can from FB, Instagram, and WhatsApp in order to sell visibility into people and their lives.This isn’t exactly a secret, but the full picture is hazy to most – diml...

Very clever way to show data FB collects.