Liked a tweet by Juliet Robertson (Twitter)

15+ alternatives to using laminates outside https://bit.ly/36H66ht Always on the look out for good ideas here. #EYShare #EYMatters, #EYTwittertagteam, #EYFS, #EarlyYears, #TeamEarlyChildhood #EYBLUK#edutwitter #EYMaths #continuousprovision #eyideas

15+ Alternatives to Using Laminated Sheets Outside

Read Outdoor learning has improved our pupils' attainment by Jay Helbert
Children here at early level experience 50 per cent of learning and play outdoors, those at first level have 33 per cent and second level children have a quarter of their school time outdoors. This has enabled the school to use a mixture of formal and informal learning outdoors to build in play-based and pupil-led learning, which, in turn, has helped to reduce anxiety and build resilience.

Really positive article in TES by Jay Helbert💙 (@learningjay) .

Our Forest School (in the grounds of Argyll Estate) and Beach School (on the shore of Loch Fyne) provide opportunities for a blended experience. These lessons take place weekly over the course of a school term and are child-centred experiences where teachers set up learning “provocations” and options for activities ranging from den-building and mapping to creating artwork and storytelling.

I’ve done a bit of outdoor learning in school but nowhere near the 25% the second level classes are managing here. I was interested to see this maths idea:

where children survey plant and animal species to gather data

I sometimes struggle to think up second level ideas for literacy & numeracy. I’ve mostly found early and first level ideas online.

The outdoors a great stimulus for writing, reports, narrative and poetry. Talking and listening seem built in. In maths we have done a fair bit of shape & measure and I can see the potential for data and related activities. It would be good to see a bank of ideas. 25% is more than once a week.

Bonus thought, has TES Scotland become a sort of medium for educational blogging. I am reading a lot of good stuff on TES.

Bookmarked Whose poo? - The Mammal Society (The Mammal Society)
Mammals can be elusive and sometimes the first clue that they are there isn't the flash of a tail or the flick of an ear poking out of the foliage but a field sign - like poo! Often, finding and identifying the poo you find in your garden or on a walk will be the only way you know that

If I ever get to take the class to the woods again this will be useful.

Replied to Play Scotland on Twitter (Twitter)
“"When children interact with loose parts, they enter a world of “what if” ... Loose parts enhance children’s ability to think imaginatively and see solutions, and they bring a sense of adventure and excitement to children’s play”. (Dale and Beloglovsky) #playeveryday”

Yes, I love it that our playground looks like a building site.

Reposted https://twitter.com/bdsdragonflies/status/1145779407744831488 by British Dragonfly Society (Twitter)

#DragonflyChallenge2019 LEARN: FAQ we get ”How do you tell a Dragonfly from a Damselfly?" If they fold wings down thier sides when perched you are watching a Damselfly. If they hold them out straight like the wings of an areoplane it’s a Dragonfly https://bit.ly/2ROoQne pic.twitter.com/8AS4wXwwUD

https://twitter.com/bdsdragonflies/status/1145779407744831488

Screenshots of pl@nt app

Pl@ntNet is the world’s best social network is an interesting article and leads to a useful looking app.

Pl@ntNet is a plant identifier that combines algorithmic and social tools to identify plants.

An algorithm matches the digital image against a massive plant database and presents its best guesses as to what type of plant it is. The user who submitted the original image picks from a list of the most likely candidates, and ranks the probability the image is a match on a five-star scale. The community then vets each image, validating the identification or suggesting a new one.

The post has lots of interesting angles on the possible future of social networks, the indieweb and a nice personal touch. Highly recommended.

Last week I crowd sourced a flower identification, I ran the same image through Pl@ntNet this morning and had confirmation of the conclusion ‘we’ had reached1.

I made a couple more tests on the app and it seems to work really well. My one problem was that submitting photos uses the location you are at at the time of submission, not where I took the image (as far as I can see). Often I want to take a picture and bring it home to identify. I don’t want to give the impression that a Scottish hill flower is at home in Glasgow city! I can of course just id flowers without uploading them but the organisation wants people to add to the collection in the name of citizen science.

I’d recommend the app itself too, it seems to work very well, could be useful for outdoor learning and Pl@ntNet’s practices and principles sound great: open and thoughtful.

fn1. It took me a long time to get to the obvious, Wood Sorrel, as I found them half way up a mountain and couldn’t see the giveaway leaves.