Replied to a tweet by Alan Levine (Twitter)

I might need a WordPress plugin than converts all links to run them through the Wayback Machine. Mansy days it feels like 90% of my blogged links are dead.

I used amber for a while & stopped for reasons i can’t recall. Used the archive option. Currently got a JavaScript that sorts broken links to my old, now gone school site where a lot of my early links pointed. I now use On This day, thanks Alan, to tend my links most days.

Bookmarked ‘Cake’ mentioned 10 times more than ‘climate change’ on UK TV – report (theguardian.com)
The report, from albert, a Bafta-backed sustainability project, also found that individual action, such as recycling, was far more frequently featured than issues that are much bigger drivers of the climate crisis such as energy and transport.

Smart research by Albert Subtitles to Save the World 2 – Editorial analysing subtitles. I’ve played with srt files for fun but this is serious!

Liked a tweet by Athole (Twitter)

Found myself listening to this. A younger me. Very enthusiastic. Tripping over words to get ideas out. And John Johnston is a brilliant host. Funny and charmingly left of centre. EDUtalk was brilliant. I miss it. @ewanmcintosh and @MrSMathsWizard all get a mention. https://twitter.com/johnjohnston/status/736100282396868609

Keeping this one for the “charming” Going to have a re-listen.

Another interesting way to blog, sheet-posting, where you blog in a Google Spread sheet. I had a quick try. I’ve messed about with using Google Sheets as a store before. Guess you alway need to remember Google could pull the sheet from under your feet. I also remember when you could stick a webpage in google docs (or dropbox) and it would be served. The Sheets-Posting site is made with glitch.

Replied to Bright green, blight green, and lean green futures | Open Thinkering by Doug Belshaw (Open Thinkering | Doug Belshaw's blog)
This is Vinay’s preferred option, and the only one he thinks is scalable and realistic. It’s “numerical” by which he means quantitative, not qualitative. You simply imagine that every human being has equal right to the planet’s “material bounty”, and then divide up what’s available, and how much they can emit.

Hi Doug,

Thanks for this link, I’d not heard Vinay Gupta before. A good listen although some of the verbal style grated a bit.  I’d heard the idea of fair shares, in relation to air miles, before and liked it. Possibly because I very seldom fly;-)