Unlike Safari’s ITP, however, Chrome’s adblocker has been created in partnership with the ad industry. The feature only blocks what the company calls “intrusive ads”, such as autoplaying video and audio, popovers which block content, or interstitial ads that take up the entire screen.

No tracking, no revenue: Apple’s privacy feature costs ad companies millions

The whole article is interesting. Especially the anger from the ad companies about Apple blocking tracking.

I’ve stuck with Safari as my main browser over the years. First because it was quick, then AppleScript. I got used to the developer tools, as a non-dev they seem the simplest. Next the integration with mobile Safari. Now it looks like there is another reason.

And if I do want to use a different browser I can open pages from Safari in another browser from the develop menu.

Just over a year ago I read about the micro.blog kickstarter project, it seemed a no brainer to back. I got in early at number 51.

Since the launch (25-April-17) I’ve been using micro.blog I’ve made over 300 posts categorised as micro. It has made me think quite a bit about blogging and social media. It is certainly one of the bigger steps of this blog’s history 1.

I am beginning to feel real affection for the software/service that micro.blog is developing into. Here, in no particular order, are some reasons why:

  • The apps, for mac and iOS are so simple elegant and clean. Both are in very early version, but they are the fairly stripped down type of software I find enjoyable to use.
  • I don’t need to use the app, I can post content in all sorts of ways 2
  • The discourse on micro.blog is at a different pace than twitter, mostly more thoughtful, certainly less hypeful. I am reading things that are sometimes marginal to my interests and enjoying them.
  • The folk on micro.blog who produce the discourse.
  • If micro.blog suddenly goes away my content and conversations will not. I’ll lose the continuing discourse & software but I can go on posting my short form posts to my own blog. The posts I made and any conversation around them is still here.
  • Manton, I started listing to his timetable microcast when I signed up for the kickstarter. The pace micro.blog is developing is on one hand reasonably quickly but on the other hand it is incredibly thoughtful. He really does seem to care about principals as opposed to grabbing huge user numbers. On one podcast he describes working on the export that would allow hosted micro.blog users to leave the service. This as an early feature!
  • You can use the service for free. I pay for cross posting of my rss feed to twitter. That is $2 a month, the service is very neat, the tweets are sensible reflections of the post, but I also want to pay something to keep the service going.
  • For a variety of reasons I’ve not fully grasped I feel like I am becoming a little more thoughtful posting than I was on twitter. I’ve not stopped using twitter, but some short posts feel as if I should own them on my own blog. Not necessarily anything deep or important but owning some of these feels better.
  • Micro.blog photo blogging is weaning me away from instagram, I get a lot less engagement but I like it. I still like Instagram, but I’ve not posted in December yet, I have visited and like a pile of pictures. I wish Instagram would: 1. let me post here and then push out to Instagram, 2. see my friends posts without out algorithmic help.
  • I am learning a bit more about the indieweb and the workings of WordPress.
  • Learning and thinking about blogging, social media, both from the growing micro.blog community and by thinking my way through how I want my blog to work.

That final point is not finished by a long way. I still am puzzled about how webmentions and other indieweb technology I am using works in practise. I’ve not finalised how I want to present the different kinds of post here on the blog.

Some other posts about microbloggin

  1. These would would include: starting my own blog as part of my school’s site, joining twitter, moving to my own domain, changing from Pivotx to WordPress and micro.blog. Every part of the blog has changed except for the text of the posts, but I think of it as the same blog.
  2. I post, in no particular order, in WordPress, from TextMate, any text in any app on my mac via appleScript, from Drafts via Workflow on iOS and with the micro.blog applications.

Happy Scribe @_getscribe

We provide you with an user friendly interface to transcribe your interviews from speech to text. Proudly made in Ireland by two students.

The prices are very reasonable, £0.09 per minute. 50p minimum charge. So I though it was worth a punt, I uploaded my most recent microcast:

And in a couple of minutes I got this back:

transcript after the jump

But there is something about an informal collection of independent blogs by people with a shared passion that makes for a much better micro-community experience than social networks or other online group platforms. I’ve experienced this first-hand with a couple of blogging communities I’ve participated in: an informal network of blogs by adoptive parents and the pen and paper enthusiast blog community.

Micro.blog and Micro-Communities

I’ve had a huge amount of learning and pleasure out of both tightly bound and loose knit online communities. Doug’s post shows how of a network of Blogs owned by individuals can be better than a silo and points out the need for hashtags or other connective tissue.

Micro blogs with webmentions one part of improving the online conversation. A method or methods for discovery and group participation would be another.

I can’t recommend micro.blog enough. It has really helped me think about my online activity in many new ways. You can get involved for free and lose nothing by joining and playing.

Listening to John Johnston’s Microcast 12: Podcatching Thoughts by Aaron DavisAaron Davis (collect.readwriterespond.com)
I am really interesting listening to your Microcasts John. Chris Aldrich is right, I need to look into Huffduffer. It is something that I see mentioned here and there, but have never got around to exploring.- percolator - fragmentum - Henrik Carlsson - Colin Walker - Colin Devroe I am really interesting listening to your Microcasts John. Ch...

Hi Aaron,
Thanks, microcasting, at least in the quick and dirty fashion I am using certainly cuts down on the time needed. I am listen to more and more microcasts and less longer form one.

I wonder if you would be interested in trying a slowcast in the style Alan is trying, It’s Out! Episode 1 of The Puerto Rico Connection – CogDogBlog. I think I just invented the word slowcast, but the idea of taking time to think and respond might be attractive?

Bookmarked

Image from page 109 of “The manual training school, compri… | Flickr No known copyright restrictions. Somewhat glitched.

A few thought about my listening habits.

Some microcasts mentioned:

featured image screenshots of Castro edited with Workflow and Snapseed. Spot the guilty secret.

Some of the things I’ve pinned to the board this week.

Featured image, a bit of processing slit-scanning strangness, guess the source.

I’ve been involved with Glow Blogs as product owner for a few years now 1. I think my main aim has been to avoid the stagnation that happened with the previous system and to keep the service as useful as possible for teachers and pupils 2.

So far we have I think managed that by keeping up with WordPress releases and adding features to improve various different aspects.

Since the rebooting of Glow in October 2014 there have been around 3 major releases of Glow Blogs every year. At the end of last session it was decided that these gradual improvements were going smoothly enough to drop back to one major release each year 3.

It was also decided to formalise the way we get ideas for improvements a little. To do this we are trying to gather suggestions in one place as opposed to the rather ad-hoc system that was in place before.

It seemed like a good idea to use the blog service itself to gather these ideas so a page has been added to the Help Blog for suggestions.

Anyone who is interested can suggest ideas and these will be triaged into the release for next summer.

This doesn’t mean that all suggestions will be taken forward. I’ve learnt my lesson a few times with suggestions of my own. Some ideas might be too expensive, some might be insecure or too difficult to implement in our setup. It was surprising how complicated adding features to Glow Blogs turned out to be. Glow Blogs is, I believe, the biggest WordPress set up in Europe so changes cannot be made lightly. On the other hand the service needs to met the needs of teachers & pupils in Scotland.

If you are a user of blogs I hope you will take a bit of time to think of how the service could be improved. Then it is just a case of filling in the form and we will take it from there. If you leave contact details with your suggestion I’ll certainly get back to you, possibly with some questions. We will also post the suggestions as they are made to the help blog to allow others to comment or express interest.

One more time, here is the link for suggestions. The cut for next years release will be at the end of November.

Featured Image: Image from page 196 of “Suggestions for handwork in school… | Flickr No known copyright restrictions.

  1. Now on a part time basis.
  2. And others involved in Scottish education.
  3. In addition to any security releases of WordPress itself.