Why we’re changing Flickr free accounts | Flickr Blog

Beginning January 8, 2019, Free accounts will be limited to 1,000 photos and videos. If you need unlimited storage, you’ll need to upgrade to Flickr Pro.

I got my mail from Flickr today explaining the changes. I’ve a pro account so it will not affect my photos at all.

I’ll be more interested in how it affects search. I often use Flickr photos to illustrate blog post, presentations and in my classroom.

I also encourage my pupils to use cc licensed images. It is hard for 8-11 year olds to attribute but the flick API allows me to help them with FlickrCC Stampr.

I wonder if the search will be less useful. There was some chat about keeping CC Images. I do hope so.

Update thanks to ronguest and jemostrom in the comments:

Photos that were Creative Commons licensed before our announcement are also safe. We won’t be deleting anything that was uploaded with a CC license before November 1, 2018. Even if you had more than 1,000 photos or videos with a CC license. However, if you do have more than 1,000 photos or videos uploaded, you’ll be unable to upload additional photos after January 8, 2019, unless you upgrade to a Pro account.

from: The Commons: The Past Is 100% Part of Our Future | Flickr Blog

That sound better:-)

Featured image for this post: flickr Scrabble by Dirk Dittmar used under a Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 2.0 license. Stamped with the tool mentioned above.

Liked #IndieWeb and #WordPress at WordCamp Riverside 2018 by Chris AldrichChris Aldrich (BoffoSocko)
If you missed it, here are slides with links and resources for my IndieWeb and WordPress presentation at WordCamp Riverside 2018. Video coming soon. Thanks to everyone who came and participated. I’m happy to answer any additional questions.

Slides Are a great overview of IndieWeb for WordPress. Looking forward to catching the video.

Event #51: “Build a Community with WordPress and Social Media”, by Luna Carmona

Luna started by giving Mark Z of FB as a good model for communication. Someone to be trusted! I guess this indicated I was not the target audience;-)

I did enjoy the talk. Luna covered the way she had used social media to support building a community around Achieve More Scotland. This is a small but valuable organisation. In a couple of years they have greatly increased online engagement.

Takeaways:

  • try multiple channels don’t be scared of dropping the ones that have little engagement.
  • Meet community where it exists using the channels folk already use.
  • Twitter in the morning, Instagram in the middle of the day and Facebook in the evening.
  • Try for community rather than followers.
  • Respond quickly.

There are lessons for online educational communities here.

There wasn’t much specific WordPress information I wonder if some IndieWeb tech could help?

Geese on a Blue October Sky

Some links I’ve put on my virtual pinboard recently. Ready for the new term?

Also on:

There is a lot of nice information in image capture.


Daring Fireball: Sometimes It’s Better to Just Start Over With iCloud Photo Library Syncing

Next, I wanted to delete every single photo and video from my iPhone. To my knowledge there is no easy way to do this on the iPhone itself. (There are a lot of tasks like this that are easy on the Mac thanks to Edit → Select All that are painfully tedious on iOS.) I connected the iPhone to my Mac with a Lightning cable and used Image Capture to delete all photos and videos from my phone. Image Capture just treats the iPhone like a regular camera. Image Capture crashed three times during this process (I’m still running MacOS High Sierra 10.13.6, for what it’s worth), but after the fourth run the iPhone had no photos or videos lefp.

I just deleted all the photos from a school iPad yesterday by selecting a couple and the dragging to select the rest. Worked with ~3000 photos but a bit clunky. I’ll use Image Capture in future. It’s an application I don’t remember very often.

In a 1-2-1 iPad class I do get a lot of benefit from having a mac in school. There a several things that can be solved with a quick airdrop to the mac and back. Given the iPads and mac are of similar vintage (2012).

I’ll edit a note on the mac, it syncs to the iPad (instantaneously it feels like) and I can Airdrop to class or group via classroom app. Now the Classroom app is available for the mac I need to think about upgrading the ageing mac to Mojave. I think it is new enough but spinning hard disk and skimpy ram might be a problem?

Replied to Spread unintelligibly thin by Jeremy Cherfas

I wonder if the problem is part of the solution? As I slowly explore the IndieWeb ideas and tools I find that quite a few don’t do exactly what I want. So I slow down. Think. Tweak. Often delete a draft.

For example, I am starting to understand Indigenous, I’ve Micropub posts set to be drafts. I don’t like the way my theme presents these posts. I remove the auto generated excerpt, tweak the title and perhaps the quote. This helps me think the post through. It becomes a little less knee-jerk.

I’ve a long way to go. I get distracted, meander, I click and like, but I think the IndieWeb is making me a happier blogger.

Replied to @bruce (micro.readinggeorgefox.com)
M.b and Who Owns a Community with @belle & @joshsharp: Also, isn’t everything built on open standards under the hood? How hard would it be to set up a “Nano.blog” which accepted the json/rss feeds and created a timeline of its own? I think that was part of Manton’s idea: if a group didn’t like his place, they could start up their own. But again, I’m trying to recall CoreInt episodes from long ago.

I am sure I’ve read/heard @manton stating the same thing, he is in favour of other micro.blog like communities.

I’ve been a member of a few educational communities and projects built round aggregations of blogs. I’ve even set up one or two wee ones.

There folk need to go out from the central hub to individual sites to join the conversation. If, and it is a big if at the moment, all the sites had webmentions enabled I am sure it would be possible to reply straight on the hub, but the reply would be sent to the original post.

This would need a bit of work on the hub, it would incorporate something like quill as a method of replying. Perhaps it would be simple to do with FeedWordPress just adding a link to pop the quill editor up… But the harder part if for community members.

For most people installing and configuring the themes and plugins needed for WordPress is a bit of a barrier. Setting up another system would be too I think.

In the future, when hubs like micro.blog abound, I’ll be able to be part of many communities using this site, categories or an other taxonomy will direct posts to one or more hubs when needed.