Replied to Re: Meet The “Teacher Instagrammers” Who Moonlight As Influencers To Make Ends Meet by Aaron DavisAaron Davis (Read Write Collect)
Isn’t it sad when the only way for teachers to make a fair wage is by selling themselves and their work on Instagram.

The linked post: Teachers Are Moonlighting As Instagram Influencers To Make Ends Meet and the thread on @audreywatters’s tweet are fascinating.

 

I think of instagram as a nice silo for sharing and liking photos in a casual way (I like being liked too). It went bad when it removed the ‘time’ from the timeline. (I don’t like its lack of interoperability much either).

I don’t think I follow any influencers so this is a world outside my ken.

The idea of using instagram as a way of showing a shiny classroom has some of the same problems at tweeting to my mind. Not that my blogging is a great example of sharing classroom practise.

I am not sure about the Teachers Pay Teachers, concept. I feel a slight distaste, but am not sure why.

Listened Tide Episode #107 from tidepodcast.org
This week, Doug and Dai discuss inter-railing, Android’s digital wellbeing controls, building ethical technology, how hacking works, taking time off chat apps, personality types, and more!

The first long podcast I’ve listend to in a while as I’ve mostly been listening to microcasts (some great ones listed on Microcast.club).

I’ve known Doug & Dai for a good few years, although I don’t think I’ve meet Dai in person, so it is nice to hear the informal chat going weaving round the edu (and not so edu) tech.

The most interesting link for me was PixelFed a federated image sharing platform, powered by the ActivityPub protocol. An instragam like service avoiding some of the drawbacks of instagram. I signed up, johnjohnston on PixelFed. It looks early days, but a not-yet working link to an API gives me hope of the possibilities of POSSE. I am still hoping that the new version of Sunlit will fill Instagram space for me, but I’ll try PixelFed for a while.

It has taken me a while to get this one together. I am still experimenting with recording on the hoof. This time I decided to record a series of short clips in Voice Memos. the intention was to string them together quickly with Ferrite. I found that a bit footery on the phone and ran into the three track for free limit.

Returned to the problem on the iPad and Hokusai. Only took a few minutes. Both ferrite and Hokusai are made by the same developer! I think I might read Difference: Between Hokusai Audio Editor and Ferrite Recording Studio — Wooji Juice I need to get a bit more practice with these apps.

Also on:

Here are some of the things I’ve tagged classroom over the summer holidays.

Featured image: my own, I spent a fair bit of the summer trying to get close to butterflies.

Another experimental microcast. I recorded this on a walk last week using the iPhone audio memos app. Just kept a memo open and recorded fragments on the go. Unfortunately at some point I hit done and when I added more, without looking, I recorded over the start.

On editing in ferrite the app crashed everytime. So I switched to Hokusai 2 cut the start pasted it to the end and then levelled in Auphonic. Finally back in Ferrite I added the intro (recorded in Ferrite and run through Auphonic).

This if far too complicated. I also need a dead cat from the phone to cut down on wind noise.

Liked The Game of Quotes by Aaron DavisAaron Davis (Read Write Collect)
Heather Marshall adapts the game Bring Your Own Book for the classroom. This involves a series of prompts to help think differently about what you are reading. Marshall also discusses creating your own prompts. This activity reminds me of the Hot Seat activity, where students are challenged to think...

The Game of Quotes: Getting once reluctant readers whispering “I want to read that!” – The Book Sommelier looks useful.

As part of my summer holiday fun with WordPress I though I might create a ‘proper’ RSS feed for my microcast.

There are quite a few podcast plugins that would do the job but I though it might be interesting to try a bit of DIY.

Back when I started a class podcast at Radio Sandaig I used to create the RSS feed by hand with a text editor and a fair bit of copy and paste. Over at Edutalk we use feedburner to massage the feed for iTunes.

I used information from How to Roll Your Own Simple WordPress Podcast Plugin | CSS-Tricks to get me started with the template.

I copied the feed-rss2.php file from the wp-includes folder to my child theme folder renaming it feed-microcast.php

wp-content/themes/sempress-child/feed-microcast.php

I adjusted the query to get the posts from my microcast category. I also hard coded the title, link, image and a few other things to simplify the process a little.

I then used the template from CSS-Tricks as a guide to adding the various podcast tags to my template.

This ended up with a pretty broken feed, mostly due to my lack of care, but I fixed it up later I got it linked up.

I didn’t want to use the custom post type approach used in the article because that would involve editing all the old posts or converting them to the new type somehow.

My first idea was to create a feed template and switch to that when the RSS feed for my microcast category was called for.

After failing to get the template to switch for the standard category feed, /category/microcast/feed I ended up with a custom feed at /feed/microcast.

and I add

add_action('init', 'customRSS');
function customRSS(){
        add_feed('microcast', 'customRSSFunc');
}

function customRSSFunc(){
        get_template_part('feed', 'microcast');
}

to my functions.php file.

I then spent a bit of time using the W3C feed validation service until I fixed the feed up to valadate.

I’ve still got to get a link to the feed into the microcast category page head tag and I hope to do that as soon as I’ve gone a bit of research. For now I’ve a link in the sidebar.

Here is the template: WordPress RSS feed template for my microcast