Cubomania revisited

A while back I did the daily create for 6 January 2014 Create a Self Portrait Cubomania Style. And knowced up a couple of quick web pages to make cubomania images and gif.

The other day I was messing about with some web pages inspired by the Universe app and was reminded of the cubomania stuff.

I’ve updated the Cubomania Gif! page so that you can, choose the number of slices, speed of the gif and the ability to add a frame of the original image. You can also make static jpg versions on the same page.





I am attracted to the random nature of cubomania, interestingly if you search for images online many look as if they have been rearranged with some taste as opposed to randomly.

Featured image on this post was from a tweet by Theo created with the webpage.

One more, this time including the original


This is #DS106

One of the best things about DS106 is the riffing and playing with other participants. I dipped my toe in the daily create stream yesterday and pulled out a great example:

As I saw this late there were already a great bunch of responses, I giffed:


I had intended to have the notes ping right off the sheet, but this looked ok and it was late (so late I lost a few frames that would have made the jump a little more dynamic).

Todd said:

and Ron:

Today Viv iced the cake:

There are deeper thinks going on on DS106 but this is #4life

#DS106 GoodSpell Final Season

This evening Marianna & I started the final season of the DS106 Good Spell on DS106 Radio.

The DS106 Good Spell is a podcast about the open online course on digital storytelling, DS106.

Some background to this series on The DS106 Good Spell Episode 0

As usual I’ll post the audio to

One of my favourite things about ds106 is how it spawns all sorts of activities like this. The Good Spell is one of my favourite favourites.

i lifted the featured image from Marianna’s  tweet  I don’t think she will mind


Commandline gifs: Cartoon The Nitty Gritty

I’ve covered most of this before, but given the news that someone reads this stuff, I though I’d document it a bit more.

Prerequisites: ffmpeg, imagemagick, gifsicle, I’ve installed all of these commandline apps via Homebrew.

Cartoon Fred’s ImageMagick Scripts: CARTOON.

I downloaded this then made it executable using the terminal:

chmode +x cartoon

I then moved in into /usr/local/bin/

the proper way is probably
mv cartoon /usr/local/bin/

but I did open /usr/local/bin/ which open the folder in the finder and dragged the file across.

I ned a movie so:

Which I downloaded with YouTube downloader tool – Fastesttube!.

I copied the download into a folder and renamed it dancer.mp4

In the terminal I move into the folder by typing cd and dragging the folder int the window and pressing return.

I then made a new folder mkdir jpg2

I switched to the finder and previewed the movie to find out where I want to start extracting frames, which turns out to be at 26 seconds, and I want to get 3 seconds worth at 6 frames per second:

ffmpeg -ss 00:00:26.000 -i dance.mp4 -t 00:00:03.000 -r 6 jpg2/dance_%04d.jpg

This give me 18 jpgs in a folder.

I move int othat folder and make a new one:
cd jpg2
mkdir toon

I then use cartoon to make a cartoon image for each jpg in the toon folder:

for i in *.jpg; do cartoon $i toon/$i;done
(cartoon uses imagemagick)

This takes a wee while, I then make yet another folder:

mkdir gifs

and convert all the cartoon jpgs into gifs:

for i in *.jpg; do convert $i gifs/$i.gif;done

(convert is part of imagemagick)

Finally I make a gif

gifsicle --delay 12 gifs/*.gif --loopcount -O3 --colors 16 -o ../../dance.gif

You can see the gif ends up in the top folder. There is a 12/100 of a second delay, it loops forever, is reduced to 16 colors and optimised (O3).

Screen Shot 2016-07-15 at 15.58.07


Along the way there are a lot of other possibilities, convert for example can adjust the brightness and contrast (and a raft of other things). I brightened these ones up a bit:



In reaction to

Like the cartooning of videos a couple of posts ago there is the opportunity to see and understand a bit more about film using this technique. Jim might be thinking that (says Alan) but so far I am just having fun.


CSS phenakistiscope

The linked site: phenakistiscope de bal | Succursale | Ruppert & Mulot is indeed lovely. It uses Flash. This got me thinking a wee bit about CSS animations.

CSS phenakistiscope was a first test, followed by More phenakistoscope.

Here is an example (click on the image to see it without animation):


Image from: NCSSM | Flickr – Photo Sharing! used under a Creative Commons — Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 2.0 Generic — CC BY-NC-SA 2.0

There are more examples on the pages linked above, but I’ve added the following css to this blog (using the jetpack css module).

.catchase {
    animation-duration: 2s;
    animation-timing-function: steps(13,end);
    animation-name: anticlockwise;
    animation-iteration-count: infinite;

@keyframes anticlockwise {
    to {
        -ms-transform: rotate(0deg);
        -moz-transform: rotate(0deg);
        -webkit-transform: rotate(0deg);
        -o-transform: rotate(0deg);
        transform: rotate(0deg);
    from {
        -ms-transform: rotate(360deg);
        -moz-transform: rotate(360deg);
        -webkit-transform: rotate(360deg);
        -o-transform: rotate(360deg);
        transform: rotate(360deg);

CSS3 Animations have some advantages over gifs, for this sort of thing, smaller files & more colours for two.

The css contains an animation @keyframes rule containing the animation code (the anticlockwise bit above) which is referred to in the images style. The bloc above could be shortened to:

animation: anticlockwise 2s steps(11,end) infinite;

I’ve played with css animation here before: Not an animated gif and am now beginning to get a handle on it. Wondering if it could be useful for optical illusions. I’d also like to make a virtual Phenakistoscope that could load different files that need different speeds and steps. Adding some sort of mask/viewer would be nice too…