Since I have an on this day page on my blog I’ve been finding old me interesting.

Yesterday I notice quite a few end of year reviews published on the last day of the year1.

Blogging highlights 3, followed 1 & 2 in 2006 but focused on the blogging my pupils (primary 6 ~10yr olds) carried out that year.

The links go to the internet archive now. Images and some links were broken but I enjoyed reading them.

I was surprised at the comments on the posts, from adults, pupils at other schools and classmates. At the time the idea of an audience and conversation was one of the main reasons I had pupils in my class blogging. We were posting photos, video, microcasting and writing poems.

It seems harder to get comments on pupils blog now. I admit I’ve not commented outside my own class lately.

This was the year before I was on twitter. A lot of the online conversation about what happens in classrooms has moved to there. While a lot of this is interesting and valuable it has mostly removed pupils from the publishing process 2. This is I believe a loss.

  1. I was thinking of writing one for 2018 but got lost in following these old posts.
  2. see also ‘School social media has been terrible at engaging parents’ | Tes News by Susan Ward
Replied to Re: Something Weird is Happening on Twitter Right Now by Aaron DavisAaron Davis (Read Write Collect)
Even better Bill is if we had such conversations from the comfort of our own backyard using bridgy and webmenbtions, rather than someone else’s playground?

An interesting Rabbit hole, Arron is replying to Something Weird is Happening on Twitter Right Now by Bill Ferriter who quotes this Dean Shareski tweet. The twitter thread discuses using twitter for conversation rather than promotion/retweeting/liking. 

This is the problem micro.blog set out to solve. So far I think it has done so, I’ve had some very good conversations there. There are not likes and retweets on micro.blog. These are mentioned negatively on the thread Dean sparked. Micro.blog make it as easy to post and comment as twitter.

Someone on micro.blog mentioned the other day that blogging superstars joined but didn’t stick (or words to that effect). Lack of reposts and visible likes makes the platform a bit more democratic.

The only thing I miss on micro.blog is the communities that exists on twitter. If there was a micro.blog for educators that would be very interesting.  I’ve some thoughts on how this could happen, but finding it slightly hard to make them into an intelligible post.

Replied to Susan Ward on Twitter (Twitter)
“Why social media ain't all that when it comes to engaging parents and how schools can unlock its real potential https://t.co/mRBaxMi5xc @ITLWorldwide @SBCEducation1 @DigitalscotNews @DigiLearnScot @Wilson722Wilson @TESScotland @TeacherToolkit @TeamSCEL @pedagoo”

Great stuff Susan. I wonder if blogging is a better approach to sharing than twitter. Easier for pupils to be part of the process? I know twitter is seem as simpler but I worry about encouraging pupils to a service which may not haver their best interests at heart.

Liked What is academic blogging and how can you use it to build your professional profile? | by Lorna Campbell (thinking.is.ed.ac.uk)
an informal outlet, blogs allow you to experiment with different writing styles and voices, enabling you to find a tone that is right for you.

Lorna Campbell, @LornaMCampbell
What is academic blogging and how can you use it to build your professional profile?.

There are many other good reasons that would apply inside and outside academia in this post/presentation.

Lorna is drinking her own blogwater with @cogdog‘s WordPress presentation splot too.

Replied to Spread unintelligibly thin by Jeremy Cherfas

I wonder if the problem is part of the solution? As I slowly explore the IndieWeb ideas and tools I find that quite a few don’t do exactly what I want. So I slow down. Think. Tweak. Often delete a draft.

For example, I am starting to understand Indigenous, I’ve Micropub posts set to be drafts. I don’t like the way my theme presents these posts. I remove the auto generated excerpt, tweak the title and perhaps the quote. This helps me think the post through. It becomes a little less knee-jerk.

I’ve a long way to go. I get distracted, meander, I click and like, but I think the IndieWeb is making me a happier blogger.

Replied to Experimenting with turning on comments for a week (Doug Belshaw's Thought Shrapnel)
I noticed a general downwards trend in the quality of online comments.

Hi Doug,
Glad to see this. There has a been consistent drift to twitter & other social for comments. I think this is a pity for several reasons.

I am responding to this with a webmention, which it looks like you have adopted. I’d hope that the quality of comments received via webmention might be better given that the comments will be published on the commenter’s own site. These might be less knee-jerk or throwaway than a tweet or toot?

There are still a few wrinkles to be ironed out of webmentions but I have high hopes that they will be more widly adopted and be a good thing.

Replied to Extending The Spaces You Need To Innovate (Further considerations) by Aaron DavisAaron Davis (Read Write Collect)
P.S. If comments are the cassette tape of the digital world, not sure what metaphor you would recommend for a comment syndicated from your own site?

Fascinating post Aaron, and an great example of why comments, linking and blogging. Just starting to follow the links in this comment took me into both familiar and new; people, places and ideas.

Just on the comment quote, your post, a comment exemplifies the power of commenting from your own site. A comment on Tom’s would probably have tripped the too many links flag for spam detection.

I do wonder how you approach commenting on sites with out webmentions, like Tom’s? Do you regard them as notes to yourself and your readers rather than replies?

Reposted Frances Bell on Twitter (Twitter)
“@suebecks @suewatling @catherinecronin @ambrouk @LTE_Hull Could I gently encourage you Sue to publish your reflection as a blog post where it can be commented and found, possibly curated in future? :) It's great having this conversation on the Twitter stream but it's more likely to disappear under the surface than bob along on top :)”

I think this every day about a tweet, so I am posting to my blog.

 

Replied to Re: Meet The “Teacher Instagrammers” Who Moonlight As Influencers To Make Ends Meet by Aaron DavisAaron Davis (Read Write Collect)
Isn’t it sad when the only way for teachers to make a fair wage is by selling themselves and their work on Instagram.

The linked post: Teachers Are Moonlighting As Instagram Influencers To Make Ends Meet and the thread on @audreywatters’s tweet are fascinating.

 

I think of instagram as a nice silo for sharing and liking photos in a casual way (I like being liked too). It went bad when it removed the ‘time’ from the timeline. (I don’t like its lack of interoperability much either).

I don’t think I follow any influencers so this is a world outside my ken.

The idea of using instagram as a way of showing a shiny classroom has some of the same problems at tweeting to my mind. Not that my blogging is a great example of sharing classroom practise.

I am not sure about the Teachers Pay Teachers, concept. I feel a slight distaste, but am not sure why.