Big Flickr Announcement: All CC-licensed images will be protected – Creative Commons

I’m happy to share Flickr’s announcement today that all CC-licensed and public domain images on the platform will be protected and exempted from upload limits. This includes images uploaded in the past, as well as those yet to be shared. In effect, this means that CC-licensed images and public domain works will always be free on Flickr for any users to upload and share.

Via @clhendricksbc

This is really great news. From a selfish point of view it means my Flickr Stampr will still make it easy for my class to attribute images in their school work.

From a wider perspective the Creative Commons post above expands on both the benefits and costs of Flickr taking this step. As explained the cost for this huge archive of photos will have to be covered by the pro accounts and Flickr’s income. Personally I am delighted to pay for this. I am not a pro photographer but I get a lot of goodness from Flickr. The least of these is probably the storage of my photos. Access to a goldmine of Creative Commons images and an API that is not to complicated for an amateur to play with are the major benefits for me.

This model of providing a free service is hopefully a much better than the free services that lead to shut down that we see so often.

Featured image a screenshot of Random Flickr Blendr using:
Puy Mary, Cantal, France | Pom’ | Flickr (CC_BY license) and
Vergului | youtu.be/rTnXnib2iEA George Enescu – Romanian Poe… | Flickr (attribution license)

Read: Welcome to Lagos by Chibundu Onuzo ★★★★☆ Quite delightful set of characters giving a wee peek into life in Lagos at the top and bottom of the social ladder. Enjoyed.

Replied to PressED WordPress and Education twitter conference | Radio #EDUtalk 27-02-19 | EduTalk by Chris AldrichChris Aldrich (BoffoSocko)
Incidentally, I could almost hear the gears turning in John’s head as I’m sure he was thinking much the same thing. He carefully restrained himself and managed to keep the conversation on track though.

Hi Chris,

Thanks for the listen, it is not often I am accused of keeping things on track;-)

I’ve though about this a wee bit. Doing the whole thing via the indieweb would be beautiful but it raises the barrier for participation very high. Setting up WordPress for indieweb is certainly doable but the number of folk interested in WordPress and education that would do this would be low. Given the notion of accessibility I think this is more something to aim for long term?

I had though of the idea of running the whole thing on p2, I’ve set up a couple of short term p2 blogs for Education Scotland to go with public events. You can set p2 to allow subscribers to post and set a widget to allow self registration. In our set up this registration was limited to Glow Scotland users. This of course loses the indieweb bit. Unfortunately p2 is pretty horrible on mobile.

I hope you get a proposal together, it would be great to have an indieWeb presence virtually at the conference. I expect you would post your presentation tweets via your site. I did consider that last time when I presented but was worried about timing and appearance on twitter which I’ve not really got my head round.

“BEST. PD. EVER!” Some teachers make bold claims for the way that Twitter supports their professional development, yet research into this area is rather limited. This study sought to gain a better understanding of the practices involved and the part that Twitter plays. It uses a sociomaterial sensibility informed by actor-network theory (ANT) to unravel the complex webs of relations which form, break apart and reform when knowledge practices are enacted in the mediated arena of Twitter.
To explore this rich but messy environment, I evoke the spirit of the Parisian flâneur to develop an ethnographic approach I refer to as ‘flânography.’

from: Exploring teachers’ professional development with Twitter: A sociomaterial analysis – Sheffield Hallam University Research Archive

Ian Guest’s phd should make for fascinating reading. I’ve followed along on his blog as best I could. The idea of twitter as CPD is a popular one that needs the sort of examination that Ian carried out.

We have interviewed Ian on Radio Edutalk about his phd back in 2016 and I am looking forward to talking to him again soon. He also published audio of some of his research interviews on Edutalk: CPDin140.

child rolling on bed joyreflected lights in window, ranbowesqInside the Sydney Opera House Concert HallMorning sky with seagullan icy sycamorejar of free goldfish food labeled on liidsuburban decayquail nestingdog romping on snowsnowscape blue skyurban landscape through fencemagnolia preparing to bloomiPad drawing of the blue morpho butterflydouble rainbowpink staircaseSilent Sentinel leafless tree silhouettesnow covered brancheslettuce leavesMLK and quoteold cameraold treestone grill
More testing of the script, pretty painless process. Once the html opens in BBEdit I preview and add alt text. Probably should improve script to respect existing alt text.

I wonder too about the copyright implications. I see this as a way to point interesting photos and their real homes. Would anyone object to this on copyright/respect grounds. Also wonder about the about of space it takes on micro.blog timeline, is it too much. I am thumbnailing at 120px square for that reason.

Cloudimage.io seems to be working out ok.