Replied to Re: Meet The “Teacher Instagrammers” Who Moonlight As Influencers To Make Ends Meet by Aaron DavisAaron Davis (Read Write Collect)
Isn’t it sad when the only way for teachers to make a fair wage is by selling themselves and their work on Instagram.

The linked post: Teachers Are Moonlighting As Instagram Influencers To Make Ends Meet and the thread on @audreywatters’s tweet are fascinating.

 

I think of instagram as a nice silo for sharing and liking photos in a casual way (I like being liked too). It went bad when it removed the ‘time’ from the timeline. (I don’t like its lack of interoperability much either).

I don’t think I follow any influencers so this is a world outside my ken.

The idea of using instagram as a way of showing a shiny classroom has some of the same problems at tweeting to my mind. Not that my blogging is a great example of sharing classroom practise.

I am not sure about the Teachers Pay Teachers, concept. I feel a slight distaste, but am not sure why.

Listened Tide Episode #107 from tidepodcast.org
This week, Doug and Dai discuss inter-railing, Android’s digital wellbeing controls, building ethical technology, how hacking works, taking time off chat apps, personality types, and more!

The first long podcast I’ve listend to in a while as I’ve mostly been listening to microcasts (some great ones listed on Microcast.club).

I’ve known Doug & Dai for a good few years, although I don’t think I’ve meet Dai in person, so it is nice to hear the informal chat going weaving round the edu (and not so edu) tech.

The most interesting link for me was PixelFed a federated image sharing platform, powered by the ActivityPub protocol. An instragam like service avoiding some of the drawbacks of instagram. I signed up, johnjohnston on PixelFed. It looks early days, but a not-yet working link to an API gives me hope of the possibilities of POSSE. I am still hoping that the new version of Sunlit will fill Instagram space for me, but I’ll try PixelFed for a while.

Read NeuroTribes: The Legacy of Autism and How to Think Smarter About People Who Think Differently by Steve Silberman

I was, for some reason expecting more about ‘long sought solutions to the autism puzzle’ from the blurb. This was more of a history lesson. Easy to read in a Sunday supplement sort of way.
The last couple of chapters were the most rewarding in helping to think about autism a little bit smarter. 📚 ★★★★☆